REDTABLE to introduce Korean restaurants, accept mobile orders, and participate in joint operation of order/payment service for Chinese tourists 

 

 

REDTABLE, a startup that developed a global platform for restaurant marketing, recently signed a contract to become the official Korean partner of Ctrip Gourmet List, the independent gourmet brand of Ctrip, China’s largest online travel website.

 

The K-ICT Born2Global Centre announced that its member company REDTABLE was named as a judge for Ctrip Gourmet List, based on its accumulated global big data and analysis technology. In addition to evaluating and recommending popular Korean restaurants for tourists from Greater China, REDTABLE will also be working with Ctrip to operate a reservation service capable of receiving orders and processing payments via mobile devices.

 

To ensure fairness and impartiality in the evaluation and designation of restaurants, Ctrip Gourmet List operates a three-step evaluation process that involves: 1) a 15,000-member field evaluation team, 2) a 500- judge panel for general restaurants, and 3) a 17-judge panel for fine-dining restaurants. After undergoing the evaluation and judging process, restaurants are classified under one of three categories: Ctrip Star, Ctrip Select, or Local Favorite.

 

Ctrip Gourmet List is a guide service for tourists from Greater China (China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, etc.) that introduces popular local restaurants overseas. It has made a name for itself as a specialized service for Chinese-speaking tourists that rivals the Michelin Guide, which is favored by tourists from English-speaking countries.

 

Founded in 1999, Ctrip is the largest online Chinese travel website to be listed on NASDAQ (2003) and holds a market share of over 50 percent in China’s online travel agency market.

 

According to Ctrip, of the 6.2 million tourists from Greater China who visited Korea last year, 2.2 million did so using its services. For the company’s 300 million members, Ctrip Gourmet List has designated 15,000 restaurants in 100 major cities worldwide as recommended restaurants.

 

President Hwang Myeong-wol of Ctrip Gourmet List Korea said, “Because Ctrip Gourmet List has immense exportability in terms of tourists from Greater China, restaurants that it recommends will be able to gain much higher levels of brand recognition.”

 

Restaurants recommended by Ctrip Gourmet List have now accumulated a total of 10 million page views and attracted one million unique users. Furthermore, the brand’s official Weibo account has six million followers, while its WeChat account has 22 million.

 


 

REDTABLE CEO Doh Hae-yong said, “Once the THAAD problem is resolved, we expect a steep increase in the number of Chinese tourists coming to Korea, which will contribute to the revitalization of local businesses. We also expect that more tourists will be getting information through Ctrip Gourmet List on restaurants that are popular among Koreans, leading to an increase in the number of tourists seeking out local businesses.”

 

REDTABLE operates Korea’s largest China B2B network and is currently supplying food tourism products to major Chinese travel agencies, including Ctrip, Tuniu, Alitrip, and TongCheng, as well as to Dianping, China’s largest restaurant review website. The company has previously been selected as a “tourism venture company” by the Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism and an “Outstanding IT Service” and “Seoul Tourism Startup” by Seoul Metropolitan Government.

 

Chief Executive Director Kim Jong-kap of Born2Global said, “REDTABLE is rapidly expanding its business through consistent cooperation with large Chinese travel agencies. For this reason, we believe that REDTABLE will come to play a leading role in the domestic restaurant and tourism industries as well.”

 

 

 

 


 

Our member in this article

 

Description

Real menu, Easy order, Direct Payment

        

 

 

Image Credit: REDTABLE

 

This is the sixth post in our series: Discover Korea’s Tech, 

where we will talk to a mix of Korean startup entrepreneurs 

who stood their own ground with their technology, 

in Korea’s economy notoriously dominated by gigantic companies. 

Stay tuned over the coming month as we talk to Korean entrepreneurs. 

You can follow our updates @technodechina for new stories in the series. 

 

Eating can sometimes prove to be the biggest adventure when travelling abroad. 

Each time you order, after examining an inscrutable menu 

with no pictures to guide you, 

it’s anyone’s guess what will actually come out, 

leading to some awkward and frustrating moments.

 

REDTABLE wants to leverage big data to lessen friction 

when ordering food in a foreign country.

“There are half a million restaurants in South Korea, 

but it’s not easy to integrate these restaurants on mobile,” 

CEO of REDTABLE, Haeyong Do says.

 

For foreign travelers visiting local restaurants, 

REDTABLE aims to provide a translated menu on the mobile, 

so that they can order the menu and pay using their phones. 

Currently, franchise companies targeting overseas markets are using REDTABLE’s solution 

to translate their menu.

 

REDTABLE came up with an algorithm 

that analyzes Food and Beverage big data to compare the restaurants. 

It also rates the best restaurant in the category 

by analyzing the vocabulary used in restaurant reviews on blogs and social media.

 

The app currently supports four languages: English, Chinese, Korean, and Japanese. 

The half of its app users are Chinese outbound travelers visiting Seoul.

 

“There’s demand from the either sides, both Korea and China. 

China sees increased outbound travelers, 

and Chinese companies want to find ways to make them use their platform, 

and Korean companies want to find ways 

to tract new Chinese customers to their service,” Mr. Do says.

 

REDTABLE is working as a bridge to connect the two sides 

by providing top local restaurant lists in Korea to Chinese services. 

Chinese customers can still use their local services 

like Ctrip, Tuniu, LY.com and Alitrip and Dianping in Korea to find fair restaurants. 

REDTABLE app is connected to Alipay and WeChat payment, 

which allows customers to pay via mobile on its app or on Dazhong Dianping. 

Once the order is made, they share the commission with the Korean company.

 

Founded in 2011 by students majoring in hotel managements,

the company is expanding into China market. 

The total sales volume is expected to reach 300 million KRW ($255,000 USD) this year.

 

REDTABLE is supported by K-ICT Born2Global Center

a major Korean government agency under the Ministry of Science, 

ICT and Future Planning (MSIP).

 


http://technode.com/2016/11/24/redtable-uses-big-data-to-demystify-foreign-menus/

 

 

Image Credit: REDTABLE

 

This is the sixth post in our series: Discover Korea’s Tech, 

where we will talk to a mix of Korean startup entrepreneurs 

who stood their own ground with their technology, 

in Korea’s economy notoriously dominated by gigantic companies. 

Stay tuned over the coming month as we talk to Korean entrepreneurs. 

You can follow our updates @technodechina for new stories in the series. 

 

Eating can sometimes prove to be the biggest adventure when travelling abroad. 

Each time you order, after examining an inscrutable menu 

with no pictures to guide you, 

it’s anyone’s guess what will actually come out, 

leading to some awkward and frustrating moments.

 

REDTABLE wants to leverage big data to lessen friction 

when ordering food in a foreign country.

“There are half a million restaurants in South Korea, 

but it’s not easy to integrate these restaurants on mobile,” 

CEO of REDTABLE, Haeyong Do says.

 

For foreign travelers visiting local restaurants, 

REDTABLE aims to provide a translated menu on the mobile, 

so that they can order the menu and pay using their phones. 

Currently, franchise companies targeting overseas markets are using REDTABLE’s solution 

to translate their menu.

 

REDTABLE came up with an algorithm 

that analyzes Food and Beverage big data to compare the restaurants. 

It also rates the best restaurant in the category 

by analyzing the vocabulary used in restaurant reviews on blogs and social media.

 

The app currently supports four languages: English, Chinese, Korean, and Japanese. 

The half of its app users are Chinese outbound travelers visiting Seoul.

 

“There’s demand from the either sides, both Korea and China. 

China sees increased outbound travelers, 

and Chinese companies want to find ways to make them use their platform, 

and Korean companies want to find ways 

to tract new Chinese customers to their service,” Mr. Do says.

 

REDTABLE is working as a bridge to connect the two sides 

by providing top local restaurant lists in Korea to Chinese services. 

Chinese customers can still use their local services 

like Ctrip, Tuniu, LY.com and Alitrip and Dianping in Korea to find fair restaurants. 

REDTABLE app is connected to Alipay and WeChat payment, 

which allows customers to pay via mobile on its app or on Dazhong Dianping. 

Once the order is made, they share the commission with the Korean company.

 

Founded in 2011 by students majoring in hotel managements,

the company is expanding into China market. 

The total sales volume is expected to reach 300 million KRW ($255,000 USD) this year.

 

REDTABLE is supported by K-ICT Born2Global Center

a major Korean government agency under the Ministry of Science, 

ICT and Future Planning (MSIP).

 


http://technode.com/2016/11/24/redtable-uses-big-data-to-demystify-foreign-menus/

 

 

Image Credit: REDTABLE

 

This is the sixth post in our series: Discover Korea’s Tech, 

where we will talk to a mix of Korean startup entrepreneurs 

who stood their own ground with their technology, 

in Korea’s economy notoriously dominated by gigantic companies. 

Stay tuned over the coming month as we talk to Korean entrepreneurs. 

You can follow our updates @technodechina for new stories in the series. 

 

Eating can sometimes prove to be the biggest adventure when travelling abroad. 

Each time you order, after examining an inscrutable menu 

with no pictures to guide you, 

it’s anyone’s guess what will actually come out, 

leading to some awkward and frustrating moments.

 

REDTABLE wants to leverage big data to lessen friction 

when ordering food in a foreign country.

“There are half a million restaurants in South Korea, 

but it’s not easy to integrate these restaurants on mobile,” 

CEO of REDTABLE, Haeyong Do says.

 

For foreign travelers visiting local restaurants, 

REDTABLE aims to provide a translated menu on the mobile, 

so that they can order the menu and pay using their phones. 

Currently, franchise companies targeting overseas markets are using REDTABLE’s solution 

to translate their menu.

 

REDTABLE came up with an algorithm 

that analyzes Food and Beverage big data to compare the restaurants. 

It also rates the best restaurant in the category 

by analyzing the vocabulary used in restaurant reviews on blogs and social media.

 

The app currently supports four languages: English, Chinese, Korean, and Japanese. 

The half of its app users are Chinese outbound travelers visiting Seoul.

 

“There’s demand from the either sides, both Korea and China. 

China sees increased outbound travelers, 

and Chinese companies want to find ways to make them use their platform, 

and Korean companies want to find ways 

to tract new Chinese customers to their service,” Mr. Do says.

 

REDTABLE is working as a bridge to connect the two sides 

by providing top local restaurant lists in Korea to Chinese services. 

Chinese customers can still use their local services 

like Ctrip, Tuniu, LY.com and Alitrip and Dianping in Korea to find fair restaurants. 

REDTABLE app is connected to Alipay and WeChat payment, 

which allows customers to pay via mobile on its app or on Dazhong Dianping. 

Once the order is made, they share the commission with the Korean company.

 

Founded in 2011 by students majoring in hotel managements,

the company is expanding into China market. 

The total sales volume is expected to reach 300 million KRW ($255,000 USD) this year.

 

REDTABLE is supported by K-ICT Born2Global Center

a major Korean government agency under the Ministry of Science, 

ICT and Future Planning (MSIP).

 


http://technode.com/2016/11/24/redtable-uses-big-data-to-demystify-foreign-menus/

 

 

Newsletter Sign Up

By clicking "submit," you agree to receive emails from Bron2Global and accept our web terms of use and privacy and cookie policy*Terms apply.