VisualCamp, the eye tracking technology company and a member company of the Born2Global Centre, released version 2.0 of SeeSo earlier this week. VisualCamp has been an active member of the Born2Global Centre since 2017.



 

SeeSo is a mobile eye tracking SDK (Software Development Kit) for mobile app developers who want to apply eye tracking into their applications without extra hardware. By using gaze data, end users can control apps with their eyes and you can figure out where they are looking. With the current state of affairs and the demand for contactless and remote services ever increasing, eye tracking is being utilized to understand users' focuses and monitoring functions to prevent fraud in mobile apps/web. VisualCamp reports this solution has had the best feedback from remote education (e-learning), remote proctoring (exams, trainings, and compiliance), and remote UX testing.

 

The release of the SeeSo 2.0 is only two months after the official launch of the SaaS (Software as a Service) platform in April to allow developers to easily manage the software.

 

Most notable about SeeSo 2.0 is the release for Android. In this release, the SDK for Android maintains eye tracking accuracy and stability comparable to the iOS version, and it will also support the Unity Engine for Android game developers. This is good news for IT service companies that want to apply eye tracking technology considering Android has a market share close to 70% of mobile users worldwide.

 

There is also an iOS version update. This updated version has improved accuracy by about 30% compared to version 1.0, and CPU computation is reduced by about 10%, so you can use gaze tracking technology more stably. In addition, the entire API was reorganized intuitively and a function was added to obtain processing data that distinguished gaze fixation and gaze movement values.

 

"At VisualCamp, we always develop our eye tracking solutions with users and developers in mind," said Yunchan Suk, CEO of VisualCamp. "For even more ease of access, we are currently developing a server-based solution so that any device, such as general computers with webcams, can utilize eye tracking next."

 

For more detailed information on SeeSo 2.0, visit https://seeso.io/.

VisualCamp's eye-tracking technology TrueGaze vastly expands smartphone functionality for manufacturers, developers, and users.

VisualCamp, a Korean startup which is a member company of the K-ICT Born2Global Centre, will officially launch TrueGaze, one of the most advanced gaze analytics and smartphone eye control solutions on the market, at CES 2019.

TrueGaze enables developers and smartphone manufacturers to scan information from users' visual gaze and enable eye control for various user applications. The company will offer demos of its visual technology at CES 2019, where visitors will have the chance to use their eyes to play games, scroll apps, and watch 360 video.

As a versatile platform, the potential benefits of eye tracking is virtually unlimited. Not only does TrueGaze present a new way for people to interact with their smartphones, but it also has the potential to change the face of gaming and any visual-based application. TrueGaze also provides novel user insights that will allow developers, manufacturers and marketers to vastly improve user experience all from an easily accessible eye-tracking platform.

"We're excited to be able to show the public and smartphone manufacturers the vast potential of VisualCamp's advanced eye-tracking technology," says CEO Charles Yunchan Suk.

VisualCamp's customers vary from mobile phone manufacturers, to mobile and VR developers, academic researchers, as well as brands who want to implement eye-tracking in their market research. These partnerships include a potential VisualCamp-developed eye tracker for the upcoming Pimax 8K headset.

VisualCamp's TrueGaze low-latency, low-CPU usage, and AI-enabled precision accuracy provides the best eye-tracking on the market. Eye-tracking features will be available to demo by media at CES 2019 and will include the following:

Gaming - Users will be able to control a game interface with their eye gaze.

Eye Scrolling - Users can scroll social media feeds or read a webpage by moving the screen with their eyes.

360 Video - Eye tracking vastly improves the experience of 360 video by letting the user naturally look around with their eyes.

Pimax VR - Foveated rendering presentation with VR partner Pimax.

VisualCamp is also partnering with interactive advertising firms to help develop services using their technology. Partner brands have included a well-known carmaker, which was able to track what part of its vehicles people were most interested in while browsing models online. VisualCamp's technology has also been implemented by Samsung Electronics for their VR products.

The company's demo will take place at the Las Vegas Convention Center, South Plaza, Booth 63325 from Jan. 8-11, 2019. Visitors will have the chance to play games, scroll apps, and use 360 video during the demo. Along with the phone demos, there will be a demo with VR developer Pimex at CES, in which a foveated rendering presentation will be provided to visitors on site.

 


 

 

 

Targeting Chinese market with smartphone-based eye-tracking technology

Signed MOU with TUS-VR of Tsinghua University regarding commercialization in China

 

 

VisualCamp unveiled its mobile eye-tracking technology at MWC Shanghai 2018, which the company participated in from June 27 to 29.

 

The K-ICT Born2Global Centre, which supports promising technology companies in their efforts to enter overseas markets, announced that member company VisualCamp showcased its self-developed mobile eye-tracking technology in China to great fanfare.

 

The mobile eye-tracking technology that VisualCamp unveiled at MWC Shanghai 2018 was designed to enable smartphone users all over the world (approx. three billion) to navigate their smartphones only using the gaze.

 


 

Mobile eye-tracking technology uses a camera attached to the front of the smartphone to track the user’s gaze. With this technology, the smartphone user can not only execute various tasks through the user interface, such as executing and switching between mobile apps, but also engage with interactive advertisements. Mobile eye-tracking technology has already attracted a great of interest from smartphone manufacturers and the advertising industry.

 

One particularly noteworthy outcome of this year’s MWC is the MOU that VisualCamp signed with TUS-VR, an affiliate of Tsinghua University, regarding the commercialization of VisualCamp’s technology in China. By signing this agreement, VisualCamp aims to establish a foothold in China as a stepping stone toward entering the global market.

 


 

VisualCamp for MWC Shanghai 2018 showing mobile eye-tracking technology

 

VisualCamp CEO Suk Yoon-chan said, “VisualCamp’s independently developed eye-tracking technology and algorithm are currently being applied by businesses in a wide range of areas. The applications of our technology are limitless. Because mobile eye-tracking technology can be used to produce all kinds of smartphone content, including advertisements, games, and educational content, we believe that it will give companies many new opportunities to earn profit.”

 

K-ICT Born2Global Centre Chief Executive Director Kim Jong-kap said, “Once combined with the smartphone’s voice-based AI, VisualCamp’s recently released eye-tracking technology will be able to provide customers with even more value. We are confident that the demonstration of this technology at this year’s Mobile World Congress in Shanghai will lead to VisualCamp’s successful entrance into not only the Chinese but also the American and European markets.”

 

For more detailed information on VisualCamp, visit http://visual.camp/


 

Offers eye-tracking technology optimized for mobile HMD, attracting significant attention from visitors at MWCS 2017

 


 

Users of Samsung Electronics' Exynos 3 (3rd generation) will now be able to experience Visual Camp's VR eye-tracking technology.

 

The K-ICT Born2Global Centre, a major Korean government agency under the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning (MSIP), announced that the VR eye-tracking technology of member company Visual Camp will be mounted on Samsung Electronics' next-generation all-in-one-type Exynos VR HMD (head-mounted display).

 

Eye tracking is crucial to both virtual (VR) and augmented reality (AR) technologies. When applied to VR and AR, the resolution of the part of the display screen being viewed by the user's eyes at any given time is sharpened, while the resolution for all other parts is reduced: this process is called "foveated rendering".

 

Several other technologies will be applied to the Exynos 3, in addition to the company's eye-tracking technology, including hand tracking, voice recognition, and facial expression recognition.

 

 

Visual Camp attracted significant attention for its VR eye-tracking technology at the Samsung Electronics booth at Mobile World Congress Shanghai 2017 (MWCS 2017), held from June 28 through July 1 in Shanghai. At the event, Samsung Electronics revealed its new Exynos 3 and VR reference platform.

 

With its mobile HMD-optimized eye-tracking technology, Visual Camp has now truly become a global player. Because its technology can be applied to both smartphone-connected and all-in-one HMD devices and features lower electricity consumption and prevents smart phone CPUs from overheating, Visual Camp has a clear comparative advantage over its competitors.

 

A measurement of the CPU power consumption of Samsung Electronics' Exynos 8890 chip resulted in the relatively low (average) figure of less than three percent, proving the product's outstanding performance.

 

 

Visual Camp CEO Suk Yunchan said, "By collaborating with Samsung Electronics, our technology was internationally recognized at MWCS 2017, enabling us to secure a bridgehead for future global marketing efforts. Now, we will continue promoting the high quality of Korean startup technologies and products overseas."

 

Chief Executive Director Kim Jong-kap of the Born2Global Centre said, "The recent buyouts by Apple, Google, and Facebook of companies that possess eye-tracking technology show that this technology is receiving a great deal of interest within the VR industry. We therefore have high expectations for the future of Visual Camp, which has demonstrated its highly promising VR-related technology."

 

The company is already widely recognized for its technological competitiveness and growth potential. After its inclusion on the 2015 Red Herring Asia 100 list, which has featured prominent industry names such as Google, Facebook, Alibaba, and Kakao, Visual Camp was also included on the G-Startup Seoul Top 15, which is a ranking which involves the participation of over 200 outstanding startup companies from all over the world.

 

 

 

 


 

Our member in this article

 

Description

Eye Tracking Technologies for Mobile VR Devices

        

 

 

Developed eye-tracking VR headset

Since last year, virtual reality (VR) has been a popular topic in the information and communications 

technology industry. VR is a technology that provides users with an immersive experience of virtual 

environments, such as outer space, the sky, and overseas sightseeing destinations. VR headsets completely 

cover users’ eyes, making it seem as if they have been transported to a completely different place. Currently, 

several global information technology companies, including Samsung, Google, Sony, and Facebook, are 

competing for dominance of the VR market.

 

Among the many startups that have emerged in recent years, riding on the popularity of VR, Visual Camp 

stands out. Visual Camp is developing VR headsets and software capable of tracking and analyzing 

users’ eye movements as well as recording how long their eyes rest upon specific virtual objects. 

Unlike conventional VR headsets, which require users to press a button to interact with the virtual world 

(software, smartphone app, etc.), Visual Camp’s headset allows users to engage in such interaction using 

only their eyes, thereby freeing both hands. After the headset is put on, it takes up to 25 seconds for it 

to recognize the user’s pupils, and the eye-tracking technology features only about one-degree of error.

 

 

Frees Both Hands and Offers Useful Big Data to Companies

With both hands free, users of VR headsets equipped with Visual Camp’s eye-tracking technology are 

able to do other things while interacting with their virtual environment, such as eating popcorn while 

watching VR content. For example, while watching a music video of an idol group, a user can enlarge 

their favorite member or have that member’s profile or interview content displayed briefly simply by looking 

in that member’s direction for a prolonged period of time.

 

Eye-tracking technology can also be used to analyze user behavior. For instance, it is possible to keep track

of whether a user is concentrating on a video, at which part of the video the user loses interest, or in which 

scene the user is particularly interested. Such user data can be used to recommend content that the user 

likes or develop user-customized services. In the form of big data, this information can be highly valuable 

to companies, such as content producers and advertisers. For example, these companies can calculate 

purchase probabilities by analyzing the movement of people’s eyes as they watch video advertisements.

 

Having shown incredible growth potential, Visual Camp has attracted great interest both at home and abroad. 

Even before its foundation, the company was recognized for its excellent idea, receiving KRW 300 million 

in startup support from the government. It was also selected to participate in 

SK Telecom’s BRAVO! Restart program. In February last year, Visual Camp met ICT officials from all over 

the world at the Mobile World Congress (MWC) in Spain, one of the three largest IT exhibitions in the world. 

In the following August, the company was listed as one of the 100 most promising venture companies in 

Asia by the U.S.-based IT magazine Red Herring. Since then, it has continued its efforts to expand into 

overseas markets, such as through its participation in the overseas Demo Day events held in Los Angeles 

last July and Beijing last December, which was made possible with the support of Born2Global.

 

 

 

 

With the Help of Mentors at a Large Company

CEO Charles Yunchan Seok, who established Visual Camp in 2014, had been interested in starting a 

company since he was a young student. In 1996, after beginning his studies at Seoul National University, 

he founded the Seoul National University Student Venture Network (SNUSV) with Song Byeong-joon, 

the CEO of Gamevil. The SNUSV, which will celebrate its 21st anniversary this year, is one of the largest 

university clubs for prospective entrepreneurs, with a total of 400 members (cumulative). 

In 1997, during his fourth year of university, Seok established Hihome, a website-building platform. 

Having emerged when many Koreans were still unfamiliar with the Internet and creating websites, 

Hihome became one of the main leaders of the information technology (IT) boom in Korea and was 

listed on the KOSDAQ in 2001.

 

Following the success of Hihome, Seok founded a video shopping mall and social commerce company, 

both of which he later shut down. In November 2014, he established Visual Camp Corporation. 

Initially, Visual Campdeveloped a camera-based tool designed to track the eyes of people with disabilities, 

who are unable to move their hands and feet, in order to allow them to type on a computer keyboard. 

The device succeeded in achieving a speed of 100 keystrokes per minute (in English). The following year, 

however, the company transitioned from assistive devices for people with disabilities to VR devices, 

based on advice from SK Telecom employees, who had mentored Visual Camp when it was a member of 

SK Telecom’s BRAVO! Restart program. Seok said, “Some employees at SK Telecom told us that, although 

assistive devices for people with disabilities are essential and important, the market is too small. After they 

pointed out the limitations of such products in terms of marketability, we turned our attention to VR.” 

Thanks to the advice of such employees of a large company, who had significant experience with the 

development and release of major products, Seok was able to gain valuable insight that was instrumental 

in determining the proper direction for his company to take.

 

World’s Best Eye-Tracking Technology Draws Attention from Big Corporations

With the growing momentum of the VR market, Visual Camp is planning to achieve full-fledged sales of its 

eye-tracking solution this year. In the first half of the year, the company plans to enter into a supply contract 

with the Chinese VR company Nibiru, which sold about two million VR headsets last year. Having developed 

the world’s best eye-tracking technology, Visual Camp is also seeking to collaborate with Samsung Electronics, 

Intel, and other major technology companies, expecting to generate sales of around KRW 360 billion in 2020. 

Moreover, it is estimated that the 20 patent applications the company is planning to submitby the end of this year 

will earn more than KRW 120 billion in sales in 2020.

 

 

 

 


 

Our member in this article

 

Description


Eye tracking VR HMD(Virtual Reality Head Mounted Display) hardware and 

software. Users can enjoy VR contents with their own eyes without using 

their hands. We can analyze gaze position in VR display and provide 

contents analysis in advertisement.


 

 

 

 

 

 

Developed eye-tracking VR headset

Since last year, virtual reality (VR) has been a popular topic in the information and communications 

technology industry. VR is a technology that provides users with an immersive experience of virtual 

environments, such as outer space, the sky, and overseas sightseeing destinations. VR headsets completely 

cover users’ eyes, making it seem as if they have been transported to a completely different place. Currently, 

several global information technology companies, including Samsung, Google, Sony, and Facebook, are 

competing for dominance of the VR market.

 

Among the many startups that have emerged in recent years, riding on the popularity of VR, Visual Camp 

stands out. Visual Camp is developing VR headsets and software capable of tracking and analyzing 

users’ eye movements as well as recording how long their eyes rest upon specific virtual objects. 

Unlike conventional VR headsets, which require users to press a button to interact with the virtual world 

(software, smartphone app, etc.), Visual Camp’s headset allows users to engage in such interaction using 

only their eyes, thereby freeing both hands. After the headset is put on, it takes up to 25 seconds for it 

to recognize the user’s pupils, and the eye-tracking technology features only about one-degree of error.

 

 

Frees Both Hands and Offers Useful Big Data to Companies

With both hands free, users of VR headsets equipped with Visual Camp’s eye-tracking technology are 

able to do other things while interacting with their virtual environment, such as eating popcorn while 

watching VR content. For example, while watching a music video of an idol group, a user can enlarge 

their favorite member or have that member’s profile or interview content displayed briefly simply by looking 

in that member’s direction for a prolonged period of time.

 

Eye-tracking technology can also be used to analyze user behavior. For instance, it is possible to keep track

of whether a user is concentrating on a video, at which part of the video the user loses interest, or in which 

scene the user is particularly interested. Such user data can be used to recommend content that the user 

likes or develop user-customized services. In the form of big data, this information can be highly valuable 

to companies, such as content producers and advertisers. For example, these companies can calculate 

purchase probabilities by analyzing the movement of people’s eyes as they watch video advertisements.

 

Having shown incredible growth potential, Visual Camp has attracted great interest both at home and abroad. 

Even before its foundation, the company was recognized for its excellent idea, receiving KRW 300 million 

in startup support from the government. It was also selected to participate in 

SK Telecom’s BRAVO! Restart program. In February last year, Visual Camp met ICT officials from all over 

the world at the Mobile World Congress (MWC) in Spain, one of the three largest IT exhibitions in the world. 

In the following August, the company was listed as one of the 100 most promising venture companies in 

Asia by the U.S.-based IT magazine Red Herring. Since then, it has continued its efforts to expand into 

overseas markets, such as through its participation in the overseas Demo Day events held in Los Angeles 

last July and Beijing last December, which was made possible with the support of Born2Global.

 

 

 

 

With the Help of Mentors at a Large Company

CEO Charles Yunchan Seok, who established Visual Camp in 2014, had been interested in starting a 

company since he was a young student. In 1996, after beginning his studies at Seoul National University, 

he founded the Seoul National University Student Venture Network (SNUSV) with Song Byeong-joon, 

the CEO of Gamevil. The SNUSV, which will celebrate its 21st anniversary this year, is one of the largest 

university clubs for prospective entrepreneurs, with a total of 400 members (cumulative). 

In 1997, during his fourth year of university, Seok established Hihome, a website-building platform. 

Having emerged when many Koreans were still unfamiliar with the Internet and creating websites, 

Hihome became one of the main leaders of the information technology (IT) boom in Korea and was 

listed on the KOSDAQ in 2001.

 

Following the success of Hihome, Seok founded a video shopping mall and social commerce company, 

both of which he later shut down. In November 2014, he established Visual Camp Corporation. 

Initially, Visual Campdeveloped a camera-based tool designed to track the eyes of people with disabilities, 

who are unable to move their hands and feet, in order to allow them to type on a computer keyboard. 

The device succeeded in achieving a speed of 100 keystrokes per minute (in English). The following year, 

however, the company transitioned from assistive devices for people with disabilities to VR devices, 

based on advice from SK Telecom employees, who had mentored Visual Camp when it was a member of 

SK Telecom’s BRAVO! Restart program. Seok said, “Some employees at SK Telecom told us that, although 

assistive devices for people with disabilities are essential and important, the market is too small. After they 

pointed out the limitations of such products in terms of marketability, we turned our attention to VR.” 

Thanks to the advice of such employees of a large company, who had significant experience with the 

development and release of major products, Seok was able to gain valuable insight that was instrumental 

in determining the proper direction for his company to take.

 

World’s Best Eye-Tracking Technology Draws Attention from Big Corporations

With the growing momentum of the VR market, Visual Camp is planning to achieve full-fledged sales of its 

eye-tracking solution this year. In the first half of the year, the company plans to enter into a supply contract 

with the Chinese VR company Nibiru, which sold about two million VR headsets last year. Having developed 

the world’s best eye-tracking technology, Visual Camp is also seeking to collaborate with Samsung Electronics, 

Intel, and other major technology companies, expecting to generate sales of around KRW 360 billion in 2020. 

Moreover, it is estimated that the 20 patent applications the company is planning to submitby the end of this year 

will earn more than KRW 120 billion in sales in 2020.

 

 

 

 


 

Our member in this article

 

Description


Eye tracking VR HMD(Virtual Reality Head Mounted Display) hardware and 

software. Users can enjoy VR contents with their own eyes without using 

their hands. We can analyze gaze position in VR display and provide 

contents analysis in advertisement.


 

 

 

 

 

 

Developed eye-tracking VR headset

Since last year, virtual reality (VR) has been a popular topic in the information and communications 

technology industry. VR is a technology that provides users with an immersive experience of virtual 

environments, such as outer space, the sky, and overseas sightseeing destinations. VR headsets completely 

cover users’ eyes, making it seem as if they have been transported to a completely different place. Currently, 

several global information technology companies, including Samsung, Google, Sony, and Facebook, are 

competing for dominance of the VR market.

 

Among the many startups that have emerged in recent years, riding on the popularity of VR, Visual Camp 

stands out. Visual Camp is developing VR headsets and software capable of tracking and analyzing 

users’ eye movements as well as recording how long their eyes rest upon specific virtual objects. 

Unlike conventional VR headsets, which require users to press a button to interact with the virtual world 

(software, smartphone app, etc.), Visual Camp’s headset allows users to engage in such interaction using 

only their eyes, thereby freeing both hands. After the headset is put on, it takes up to 25 seconds for it 

to recognize the user’s pupils, and the eye-tracking technology features only about one-degree of error.

 

 

Frees Both Hands and Offers Useful Big Data to Companies

With both hands free, users of VR headsets equipped with Visual Camp’s eye-tracking technology are 

able to do other things while interacting with their virtual environment, such as eating popcorn while 

watching VR content. For example, while watching a music video of an idol group, a user can enlarge 

their favorite member or have that member’s profile or interview content displayed briefly simply by looking 

in that member’s direction for a prolonged period of time.

 

Eye-tracking technology can also be used to analyze user behavior. For instance, it is possible to keep track

of whether a user is concentrating on a video, at which part of the video the user loses interest, or in which 

scene the user is particularly interested. Such user data can be used to recommend content that the user 

likes or develop user-customized services. In the form of big data, this information can be highly valuable 

to companies, such as content producers and advertisers. For example, these companies can calculate 

purchase probabilities by analyzing the movement of people’s eyes as they watch video advertisements.

 

Having shown incredible growth potential, Visual Camp has attracted great interest both at home and abroad. 

Even before its foundation, the company was recognized for its excellent idea, receiving KRW 300 million 

in startup support from the government. It was also selected to participate in 

SK Telecom’s BRAVO! Restart program. In February last year, Visual Camp met ICT officials from all over 

the world at the Mobile World Congress (MWC) in Spain, one of the three largest IT exhibitions in the world. 

In the following August, the company was listed as one of the 100 most promising venture companies in 

Asia by the U.S.-based IT magazine Red Herring. Since then, it has continued its efforts to expand into 

overseas markets, such as through its participation in the overseas Demo Day events held in Los Angeles 

last July and Beijing last December, which was made possible with the support of Born2Global.

 

 

 

 

With the Help of Mentors at a Large Company

CEO Charles Yunchan Seok, who established Visual Camp in 2014, had been interested in starting a 

company since he was a young student. In 1996, after beginning his studies at Seoul National University, 

he founded the Seoul National University Student Venture Network (SNUSV) with Song Byeong-joon, 

the CEO of Gamevil. The SNUSV, which will celebrate its 21st anniversary this year, is one of the largest 

university clubs for prospective entrepreneurs, with a total of 400 members (cumulative). 

In 1997, during his fourth year of university, Seok established Hihome, a website-building platform. 

Having emerged when many Koreans were still unfamiliar with the Internet and creating websites, 

Hihome became one of the main leaders of the information technology (IT) boom in Korea and was 

listed on the KOSDAQ in 2001.

 

Following the success of Hihome, Seok founded a video shopping mall and social commerce company, 

both of which he later shut down. In November 2014, he established Visual Camp Corporation. 

Initially, Visual Campdeveloped a camera-based tool designed to track the eyes of people with disabilities, 

who are unable to move their hands and feet, in order to allow them to type on a computer keyboard. 

The device succeeded in achieving a speed of 100 keystrokes per minute (in English). The following year, 

however, the company transitioned from assistive devices for people with disabilities to VR devices, 

based on advice from SK Telecom employees, who had mentored Visual Camp when it was a member of 

SK Telecom’s BRAVO! Restart program. Seok said, “Some employees at SK Telecom told us that, although 

assistive devices for people with disabilities are essential and important, the market is too small. After they 

pointed out the limitations of such products in terms of marketability, we turned our attention to VR.” 

Thanks to the advice of such employees of a large company, who had significant experience with the 

development and release of major products, Seok was able to gain valuable insight that was instrumental 

in determining the proper direction for his company to take.

 

World’s Best Eye-Tracking Technology Draws Attention from Big Corporations

With the growing momentum of the VR market, Visual Camp is planning to achieve full-fledged sales of its 

eye-tracking solution this year. In the first half of the year, the company plans to enter into a supply contract 

with the Chinese VR company Nibiru, which sold about two million VR headsets last year. Having developed 

the world’s best eye-tracking technology, Visual Camp is also seeking to collaborate with Samsung Electronics, 

Intel, and other major technology companies, expecting to generate sales of around KRW 360 billion in 2020. 

Moreover, it is estimated that the 20 patent applications the company is planning to submitby the end of this year 

will earn more than KRW 120 billion in sales in 2020.

 

 

 

 


 

Our member in this article

 

Description


Eye tracking VR HMD(Virtual Reality Head Mounted Display) hardware and 

software. Users can enjoy VR contents with their own eyes without using 

their hands. We can analyze gaze position in VR display and provide 

contents analysis in advertisement.


 

 

 

 

 

 

Image Credit: VisualCamp

 

This is the fourth post in our series: Discover Korea’s Tech, 

 

 

where we will talk to a mix of Korean startup entrepreneurs 

who stood their own ground with their technology, 

in Korea’s economy notoriously dominated by gigantic companies. 

Stay tuned over the coming month as we talk to Korean entrepreneurs. 

You can follow our updates @technodechina for new stories in the series.

 

The big debate around virtual reality is how we monetize on it. 

VR advertisement is seen as a one way to monetize VR content, 

but it is unclear how much the ad will gain traction from viewers. 

Korea-based VisualCamp has a solution to advertisers 

who wants to measure how effective a VR ad is. 

The company has developed a technology 

that enables users to input signals with their gaze in VR.

 

“VR content should take off before we talk about VR advertisement, of course. 

VR advertisement follows the VR content boom,” Charles Seok, 

co-founder and CEO of VisualCamp says. 

“Once we have eye-tracking technology, it will drive the VR advertisement market closer.”


Main competitors include Japan-based startup Fove,EyeTribe, EyeFluence and SMI. 

EyeFluence, the eye-tracking company was acquired by Google last month. 

Charles points out that other eye tracking companies are focused on PC-based VR headset, 

which will limit its reach because of its high price. 

VisualCamp says its technology is more affordable and accessible 

since it supports mobile-based VR headset both supporting Android and All-in-one type. 

“We developed an eye-tracking algorithm that occupies CPU lower than 10%,” Charles says.

“VR advertisement market will take off on mobile-based VR. 

Since smartphone-based VR headsets are rather affordable to customers, 

it will get a lot of paid advertisement,” Charles says. 

 

“PC-based VR advertisement market will come in slower, 

since PC-based VR HMD is still too expensive.”

 

 

Eye-tracking technology adopted in different sectors

 

“In the commerce sector, advertisers can figure out 

if a viewer would purchase the item or not in 3D shopping malls, 

using VisualCamp’s eye tracking solution,” Charles says. 

For example, when brand products are used in a 360 movie, 

the company can measure how effective is the brand’s advertisement on different scenes.

 

The prediction is about 75% accurate in the current stage, 

which the company looks to raise its accuracy as high as 90%, 

as they develop through their technology. 

The technology can also find out 

if the viewers feel the advertisement model is appealing to them or not, using the gaze analysis.

 

“When VR commerce, say, Alibaba’s BUY+ is realized, 

eye tracking technology can actually help increase purchase conversion rate,” Charles says. 

“When a user’s likeliness of purchasing the item is high, 

then the company can send out a coupon.”


The technology has other possibilities to be applied to other sectors 

such as games, education, 360 movies, advertisements, and research.


“In a poker game, you will notice if the guy next to you is a professional or not. 

In education sector, you will notice if the person is illiterate or not using gaze analysis,” Charles says.

 

The Korean company is working with Chinese VR company Nibiru

a Nanjing-based company that develops 2K virtual reality headset solution 

to bring in its technology to China. 

Its competitor Fove has received funding from Samsung Ventures last year.

 

“In China, all the VR components, like software, hardware are moving forward. 

South Korea has a strong content base and technology, 

but consumers and companies are still slow in adapting VR,” Charles says.

 

VisualCamp was selected by Red Herring 

as one of the most innovative 100 technology startups in Asia this year. 

The company is supported by K-ICT Born2Global Center

a major Korean government agency under the Ministry of Science, 

ICT and Future Planning (MSIP).


 

http://technode.com/2016/11/16/discover-koreas-tech-visualcamp-eye-tracking-company-for-vr-ads-monetization/



 

Image Credit: VisualCamp

 

This is the fourth post in our series: Discover Korea’s Tech, 

 

 

where we will talk to a mix of Korean startup entrepreneurs 

who stood their own ground with their technology, 

in Korea’s economy notoriously dominated by gigantic companies. 

Stay tuned over the coming month as we talk to Korean entrepreneurs. 

You can follow our updates @technodechina for new stories in the series.

 

The big debate around virtual reality is how we monetize on it. 

VR advertisement is seen as a one way to monetize VR content, 

but it is unclear how much the ad will gain traction from viewers. 

Korea-based VisualCamp has a solution to advertisers 

who wants to measure how effective a VR ad is. 

The company has developed a technology 

that enables users to input signals with their gaze in VR.

 

“VR content should take off before we talk about VR advertisement, of course. 

VR advertisement follows the VR content boom,” Charles Seok, 

co-founder and CEO of VisualCamp says. 

“Once we have eye-tracking technology, it will drive the VR advertisement market closer.”


Main competitors include Japan-based startup Fove,EyeTribe, EyeFluence and SMI. 

EyeFluence, the eye-tracking company was acquired by Google last month. 

Charles points out that other eye tracking companies are focused on PC-based VR headset, 

which will limit its reach because of its high price. 

VisualCamp says its technology is more affordable and accessible 

since it supports mobile-based VR headset both supporting Android and All-in-one type. 

“We developed an eye-tracking algorithm that occupies CPU lower than 10%,” Charles says.

“VR advertisement market will take off on mobile-based VR. 

Since smartphone-based VR headsets are rather affordable to customers, 

it will get a lot of paid advertisement,” Charles says. 

 

“PC-based VR advertisement market will come in slower, 

since PC-based VR HMD is still too expensive.”

 

 

Eye-tracking technology adopted in different sectors

 

“In the commerce sector, advertisers can figure out 

if a viewer would purchase the item or not in 3D shopping malls, 

using VisualCamp’s eye tracking solution,” Charles says. 

For example, when brand products are used in a 360 movie, 

the company can measure how effective is the brand’s advertisement on different scenes.

 

The prediction is about 75% accurate in the current stage, 

which the company looks to raise its accuracy as high as 90%, 

as they develop through their technology. 

The technology can also find out 

if the viewers feel the advertisement model is appealing to them or not, using the gaze analysis.

 

“When VR commerce, say, Alibaba’s BUY+ is realized, 

eye tracking technology can actually help increase purchase conversion rate,” Charles says. 

“When a user’s likeliness of purchasing the item is high, 

then the company can send out a coupon.”


The technology has other possibilities to be applied to other sectors 

such as games, education, 360 movies, advertisements, and research.


“In a poker game, you will notice if the guy next to you is a professional or not. 

In education sector, you will notice if the person is illiterate or not using gaze analysis,” Charles says.

 

The Korean company is working with Chinese VR company Nibiru

a Nanjing-based company that develops 2K virtual reality headset solution 

to bring in its technology to China. 

Its competitor Fove has received funding from Samsung Ventures last year.

 

“In China, all the VR components, like software, hardware are moving forward. 

South Korea has a strong content base and technology, 

but consumers and companies are still slow in adapting VR,” Charles says.

 

VisualCamp was selected by Red Herring 

as one of the most innovative 100 technology startups in Asia this year. 

The company is supported by K-ICT Born2Global Center

a major Korean government agency under the Ministry of Science, 

ICT and Future Planning (MSIP).


 

http://technode.com/2016/11/16/discover-koreas-tech-visualcamp-eye-tracking-company-for-vr-ads-monetization/



 

Image Credit: VisualCamp

 

This is the fourth post in our series: Discover Korea’s Tech, 

 

 

where we will talk to a mix of Korean startup entrepreneurs 

who stood their own ground with their technology, 

in Korea’s economy notoriously dominated by gigantic companies. 

Stay tuned over the coming month as we talk to Korean entrepreneurs. 

You can follow our updates @technodechina for new stories in the series.

 

The big debate around virtual reality is how we monetize on it. 

VR advertisement is seen as a one way to monetize VR content, 

but it is unclear how much the ad will gain traction from viewers. 

Korea-based VisualCamp has a solution to advertisers 

who wants to measure how effective a VR ad is. 

The company has developed a technology 

that enables users to input signals with their gaze in VR.

 

“VR content should take off before we talk about VR advertisement, of course. 

VR advertisement follows the VR content boom,” Charles Seok, 

co-founder and CEO of VisualCamp says. 

“Once we have eye-tracking technology, it will drive the VR advertisement market closer.”


Main competitors include Japan-based startup Fove,EyeTribe, EyeFluence and SMI. 

EyeFluence, the eye-tracking company was acquired by Google last month. 

Charles points out that other eye tracking companies are focused on PC-based VR headset, 

which will limit its reach because of its high price. 

VisualCamp says its technology is more affordable and accessible 

since it supports mobile-based VR headset both supporting Android and All-in-one type. 

“We developed an eye-tracking algorithm that occupies CPU lower than 10%,” Charles says.

“VR advertisement market will take off on mobile-based VR. 

Since smartphone-based VR headsets are rather affordable to customers, 

it will get a lot of paid advertisement,” Charles says. 

 

“PC-based VR advertisement market will come in slower, 

since PC-based VR HMD is still too expensive.”

 

 

Eye-tracking technology adopted in different sectors

 

“In the commerce sector, advertisers can figure out 

if a viewer would purchase the item or not in 3D shopping malls, 

using VisualCamp’s eye tracking solution,” Charles says. 

For example, when brand products are used in a 360 movie, 

the company can measure how effective is the brand’s advertisement on different scenes.

 

The prediction is about 75% accurate in the current stage, 

which the company looks to raise its accuracy as high as 90%, 

as they develop through their technology. 

The technology can also find out 

if the viewers feel the advertisement model is appealing to them or not, using the gaze analysis.

 

“When VR commerce, say, Alibaba’s BUY+ is realized, 

eye tracking technology can actually help increase purchase conversion rate,” Charles says. 

“When a user’s likeliness of purchasing the item is high, 

then the company can send out a coupon.”


The technology has other possibilities to be applied to other sectors 

such as games, education, 360 movies, advertisements, and research.


“In a poker game, you will notice if the guy next to you is a professional or not. 

In education sector, you will notice if the person is illiterate or not using gaze analysis,” Charles says.

 

The Korean company is working with Chinese VR company Nibiru

a Nanjing-based company that develops 2K virtual reality headset solution 

to bring in its technology to China. 

Its competitor Fove has received funding from Samsung Ventures last year.

 

“In China, all the VR components, like software, hardware are moving forward. 

South Korea has a strong content base and technology, 

but consumers and companies are still slow in adapting VR,” Charles says.

 

VisualCamp was selected by Red Herring 

as one of the most innovative 100 technology startups in Asia this year. 

The company is supported by K-ICT Born2Global Center

a major Korean government agency under the Ministry of Science, 

ICT and Future Planning (MSIP).


 

http://technode.com/2016/11/16/discover-koreas-tech-visualcamp-eye-tracking-company-for-vr-ads-monetization/



 

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