Dable, a content discovery platform and a member company of the Born2Global Centre, recently published its "Indonesia Media Consumption Trend Report," an analysis of how media content is consumed as a result of COVID-19. The report spans consumption trends for major Indonesian media companies over a three-month period (February-April 2020). Dable has been an active member of the Born2Global Centre since 2017.



 

Dable is a content discovery platform that analyzes data collected from over 2,300 media companies worldwide to provide individually-tailored recommendations to site visitors based on various personal traits (gender, age, areas of interest, etc.). It has partnership contracts with approximately 100 Indonesian media firms, including major newspapers, magazines and blogs.

 

According to Dable's report, the amount of media content consumed increased by 28 percent in March over February (month in which Indonesia confirmed its first COVID-19 case). The subsequent nationwide spread of COVID-19 resulted in high levels of content consumption for April as well.

 

The report divided media into six categories (Business, Entertainment, General News, News, Regional, Sports) and analyzed the influence of COVID-19 on media consumption for each.

 

"Business" consumption was 62 percent higher in April than in February—the highest rate of increase for all six categories—attributed to the sharp drop in stock prices due to pandemic-related fears and a subsequent increase in general interest in economic issues. In April, the month that COVID-19 began spreading in earnest nationwide, "Regional" consumption had the second highest increase rate (61 percent higher than February).

 

In terms of content consumed each day per category, "Entertainment" had the highest increase rate at 35 percent (in April compared to February), believed to be due to people gravitating to entertainment news to cope with the stress of watching COVID-19-related news. On the other hand, "Sports" consumption decreased in April by 12 percent compared to February due to cancellations of matches and tournaments due to COVID-19.

 

Dable also analyzed consumption trends based on type of device. Consumption levels increased for both mobile phones and PCs along with the spread of COVID-19. For PCs, the rate of increase was as high as 35 percent in March over February, but dropped to 20 percent in April. The reason for this decrease is believed to be the increasing use of WFH (work from home) measures due to PSBB (Pembatasan Sosial Berskala Besar, or "large-scale social restrictions). On the other hand, mobile consumption rose approximately 27 percent in both March and April over February due to the lack of relation to WFH.

 

Lee Ho-young, Dable Indonesia's general manager: "The COVID-19 pandemic is bringing immense changes to all areas of society, including the economy and culture. The same is true for how we consume media content. The longer periods of time spent at home due to WFH and PSBB measures means that there is that much more time to consume content. People are very interested not only in information on the coronavirus but also ways to make staying at home more enjoyable." Lee hopes that the report "can help us understand how content consumption trends have changed due to COVID-19 as well as the areas that people are most interested in."

 

The report can be downloaded here: http://dable.io/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Indonesia-Media-Consumption-Trend-Impact-of-Covid-19-on-Media-Consumption-Behavior-Dable-Inc.pdf

 

 

 

On October 22, Dable, a member company of the Born2Global Centre, announced that it has secured over 200 Taiwan media partners, including not only major media partners such as ETtoday, NOWnews, Chinatimes, Liberty Times, and SET News but also vertical category magazines, blogs, and online communities. These partner companies produce diverse types of news content, including in the areas of community, travel/food, fashion/beauty/entertainment, tech/car/sports, and business/finance.

 

Dable analyzes content consumption in real-time based on big data and personalization technology in order to offer its "Dable Content Recommendation," a service that recommends individually tailored content on both desktop and mobile devices. This service provides related data and articles with which media outlets can conduct independent data analyses (funnel analysis, perused article rankings, etc.).

 

By showing the user content that he or she will most likely find interesting through reccomendation (e.g. "Content you may like") at the bottom of news articles, media companies can increase the time that users spend on their websites, thereby increasing their page views. Since applying Dable Content Recommendation, Dable announced that its page views have increased by 5 to 10 percent on PCs and by as much as 7 to 40 percent on mobile devices.

 

Dable provides several recommendation algorithms that can be used selectively depending on the characteristics of the desired media type, including: "Personalized Articles," which provides content that is tailored to the interests of each user; "Perused Articles," which shows content that was read previously by the user; and "Popular by Gender/Age," which shows news items according to their popularity by gender and/or age.

 

In Korea, Dable holds a market share of 80 percent. In 2017, the company, based on its superior technological prowess, branched out into several Asian markets, including Taiwan, Japan, Indonesia, and Vietnam. Currently, Dable has partnerships with approximately 1,800 media corporations in Korea (MBC, MSN, and Kakao), Indonesia (Liputan6, Suara, and Kaskus), Vietnam (Thanh Nien, Saostar, and Bongda), and other countries and regions in Asia.

 

Another key service offered by Dable is "Dable Native Ad." By exposing users to advertisements that are similar in format to website content, this service catches users' attention while not interrupting their consumption of content, resulting in high performance levels. Dable Native Ad is markedly different from existing advertisement providers, who expose all or segmented users to random ads. By showing ads that are actually related to users' interests (e.g. showing an advertisement for airplane tickets to a user who is reading a travel article), which are analyzed in advance, Dable is able to offer a much more effective advertising service.

 

Dable CEO Chaehyun Lee said, "Dable boasts not only broad coverage but also partnerships with media publishers that provide diverse forms of content. In this way, advertisers can target the desired audience based on age, gender, or area of interest. Through close cooperation with our Taiwanese media partners, Dable will not only be expanding our coverage but also sophisticating our advertisement platform in order to increase the profitability of both media companies and advertisers."

 

 

Recently, sports fans may have noticed a new type of replay where the play stops and rotates to a new angle. Those replays have been made possible with technology from 4DReplay that has been shown by CBS Sports, FOX Sports, NBC Sports. A company created in South Korea and part of the K-ICT Born2Global Centre startup incubator, 4DReplay does exactly what the name suggests with a time slice video production system enabling four-dimensional, 360-degree viewing of movements with any shot, at any time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CBS Sports, together w/ 4DReplay, debuted replay technology never before seen in US national broadcast during today’s @OhioStateHoops v. @UNC_Basketball game in the @CBSSports Classic.

The replay system creates a 360-degree video of moving objects with any angle and depth.

 

One of the first major applications of the tech was for the 2018 NHL All-Star Game last month. The technology works for hockey because it allows dynamic views of one of the hardest sports to capture. For the All-Star Game, 4DReplay set up 100 cameras, 50 on each side of the ice.

 

“We are excited to partner with the NHL and 4DReplay to bring an exciting new look at replays to our fans,” John McGuinness, Coordinating Producer at NBC Sports, said in a statement. “Being able to seamlessly move around an entire play without switching shots, will give the viewers at home an incredible look at the action on the ice.”

“Seconds after key plays, fans will see four-dimensional views of the action from any angle, and experience the game like never before,” Jung said in a statement. “Working with NBC and the NHL provides 4DReplay with a significant platform for wide adaption of our technology in North America.”

FOX Sports and UFC have seen 4DReplay enhance the viewing experience.


 

Intel has its own version of immersive replay in True View Technology. According to 4DReplay, it differentiates itself by creating and playing these 360-degree videos for broadcast in only five to 10 seconds.

“The main reason for 4DRReplay’s growing visibility in the industry is its unparalleled technology, which compares favorably in terms of quality and performance than that of the Israeli startup that was acquired by Intel,” according to the K-ICT Born2Global Centre, referring to Replay Technologies.

Be on the look out for 4DReplay integration in many sports broadcasts in the future.

 

Korea’s media exports in the second quarter of 2017 were worth USD 1.53 billion, 15.4 percent higher than exports during the same period last year, announced the Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism and the Korea Creative Content Agency. The photo shows the annual video game fair G-Star in Busan in November 2016. (Yonhap News)



By Kim Tae Won and Kim Young Shin 

Exports of Korean media in the second quarter of 2017 jumped 15.4 percent to USD 15.3 billion, compared to the same period in the previous year. 

According to data released by the Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism and the Korea Creative Content Agency on Oct. 12, the video game industry exported products worth USD 830 million, the broadcast industry USD 140 million and the animation industry USD 90 million. 

In particular, the video game industry now amounts to 54.6 percent of Korea's total media exports. 

NHN Entertainment’s video games "Compass" and "Crusader Quest" and NCsoft’s "Lineage M" grew in popularity in Japan. They saw exports over 70 percent higher this year than the same period last year. 

According to the government statistics, Korean media exports to China decreased in the first quarter, but increased in the second quarter, thanks to diversification and to Korea's trade partners. 

twkim0717@korea.kr

 

 

 

 

 


 

 News from 

 

 

 

 

 

Snap’s Spectacles are having a spectacular debut today, with (at least) hundreds of people lining up at their first Snapbot pop-up vending machine location in Venice Beach. We got the chance to speak to a few of those lucky enough to have grabbed some today, and they told us what it’s like to use the clip capturing face wear.

Jameson Detweiler, co-founder and CEO of AR startup Fantasmo.io, shared his pics and video of what it’s like to buy Spectacles from Snapchat’s adorable vending bot, and also shared some of this thoughts with TC about using them via email:

So I’m not a huge Snapchat user, but I’m building an AR startup, so clearly I need to be playing with these. And they’re a blast. I actually think this is going to get me to use Snapchat more.

They’re about as simple as possible. You pair them with your iPhone over Bluetooth. Just point them at the QR code on your phone. Then you give them a name. Once that’s done, put them on, tap the button, and it records 10 seconds of video. The LED lights spin while you’re recording. HD video requires you to set up wifi to import.

Specs has a dedicated button on the camera screen underneath the main photo button. Tapping it takes you to the Specs section of Memories. Everything syncs up pretty quickly (in SD over Bluetooth). You can pick a Story and then edit it with stickers, 3D stickers, text, etc. It doesn’t look like you can do any Lenses, including World Lenses, which makes sense because those are activated before you shoot on the regular Snapchat.

The circular video is super cool. Being able to rotate your phone and see more is pretty awesome.

Johnny Martin, an LA-based cameraman, found setup and use equally easy, and had the following thoughts about Spectacle’s potential now and in the future:

 

So [Spectacles are] extremely easy to use –  press a button and it records. It feels like it will be second nature for people who wear them consistently. There’s no friction, very simple.

Watching the footage back just feels like watching a memory because of the wide-angle lens. It’s similar to a GoPro (obviously lower resolution), but it also removes the camera from being in front of what you are looking at. So in a way, you get more of the real experience and it removes the phone from being in front of your face, too.

If you’re at a concert or the beach or wherever, there is nothing between you and the moment. Friction is gone, and the moment is much more raw and real, which has always lent itself better to Snapchat vs. Instagram, etc.

Snap is smart to have made it a toy and relatively affordable. Even on their Twitter account they are retweeting people making fun of it. They’re keeping it light, not taking themselves seriously (look at the vending machine for the Spectacles) and just having fun. That removes any stigma, as it should be about fun anyway – which is where Google Glass failed in part.

The potential of the tech is what is really fascinating: imagine an iteration or two from now where the camera is always recording and buffering and you press the button to save what you just saw. You don’t always have a camera on you to capture moments that happen or it’s too late by the time you pull your phone out, but in theory you could always just press a button to lock down a moment.

These buffers exist in cameras used for news/documentaries/etc. That hardware basically just has a set amount of storage that constantly records (if you have the setting turned on), and when whatever moment happens you’re waiting to capture, you just press record and it’s saved. That could lead some to picture to the scary dystopian future often seen in movies, of cameras everywhere recording everything all the time, but in reality i think we are probably headed in that direction regardless.

Spectacles are designed as a toy and made for fun, and that’s the way a lot of good tech starts out. Time will tell how much they stick, but the way Snap seems to be handling this rollout feels good. They aren’t taking themselves too seriously and that makes people more comfortable with the product and their vision as a camera company.

Martin’s appraisal of Snap’s approach to this rollout is spot on; it’s keeping everything about the product, from design, to use, to distribution, light and breezy. It’s on brand and it’s a clever and decidedly fresh way to do a hardware product launch in the era of the grand Apple keynote.

We’ll have more first-hand impressions of Spectacles coming up shortly, but for now it sounds like the company did what it set out to do pretty nicely.Snap’s Spectacles are having a spectacular debut today, with (at least) hundreds of people lining up at their first Snapbot pop-up vending machine location in Venice Beach. We got the chance to speak to a few of those lucky enough to have grabbed some today, and they told us what it’s like to use the clip capturing face wear.

Jameson Detweiler, co-founder and CEO of AR startup Fantasmo.io, shared his pics and video of what it’s like to buy Spectacles from Snapchat’s adorable vending bot, and also shared some of this thoughts with TC about using them via email:

So I’m not a huge Snapchat user, but I’m building an AR startup, so clearly I need to be playing with these. And they’re a blast. I actually think this is going to get me to use Snapchat more.

They’re about as simple as possible. You pair them with your iPhone over Bluetooth. Just point them at the QR code on your phone. Then you give them a name. Once that’s done, put them on, tap the button, and it records 10 seconds of video. The LED lights spin while you’re recording. HD video requires you to set up wifi to import.

Specs has a dedicated button on the camera screen underneath the main photo button. Tapping it takes you to the Specs section of Memories. Everything syncs up pretty quickly (in SD over Bluetooth). You can pick a Story and then edit it with stickers, 3D stickers, text, etc. It doesn’t look like you can do any Lenses, including World Lenses, which makes sense because those are activated before you shoot on the regular Snapchat.

The circular video is super cool. Being able to rotate your phone and see more is pretty awesome.

 

Johnny Martin, an LA-based cameraman, found setup and use equally easy, and had the following thoughts about Spectacle’s potential now and in the future:

 

So [Spectacles are] extremely easy to use –  press a button and it records. It feels like it will be second nature for people who wear them consistently. There’s no friction, very simple.

Watching the footage back just feels like watching a memory because of the wide-angle lens. It’s similar to a GoPro (obviously lower resolution), but it also removes the camera from being in front of what you are looking at. So in a way, you get more of the real experience and it removes the phone from being in front of your face, too.

If you’re at a concert or the beach or wherever, there is nothing between you and the moment. Friction is gone, and the moment is much more raw and real, which has always lent itself better to Snapchat vs. Instagram, etc.

Snap is smart to have made it a toy and relatively affordable. Even on their Twitter account they are retweeting people making fun of it. They’re keeping it light, not taking themselves seriously (look at the vending machine for the Spectacles) and just having fun. That removes any stigma, as it should be about fun anyway – which is where Google Glass failed in part.

The potential of the tech is what is really fascinating: imagine an iteration or two from now where the camera is always recording and buffering and you press the button to save what you just saw. You don’t always have a camera on you to capture moments that happen or it’s too late by the time you pull your phone out, but in theory you could always just press a button to lock down a moment.

These buffers exist in cameras used for news/documentaries/etc. That hardware basically just has a set amount of storage that constantly records (if you have the setting turned on), and when whatever moment happens you’re waiting to capture, you just press record and it’s saved. That could lead some to picture to the scary dystopian future often seen in movies, of cameras everywhere recording everything all the time, but in reality i think we are probably headed in that direction regardless.

Spectacles are designed as a toy and made for fun, and that’s the way a lot of good tech starts out. Time will tell how much they stick, but the way Snap seems to be handling this rollout feels good. They aren’t taking themselves too seriously and that makes people more comfortable with the product and their vision as a camera company.

Martin’s appraisal of Snap’s approach to this rollout is spot on; it’s keeping everything about the product, from design, to use, to distribution, light and breezy. It’s on brand and it’s a clever and decidedly fresh way to do a hardware product launch in the era of the grand Apple keynote.

We’ll have more first-hand impressions of Spectacles coming up shortly, but for now it sounds like the company did what it set out to do pretty nicely.

 

 

 

 

 

Snap’s Spectacles are having a spectacular debut today, with (at least) hundreds of people lining up at their first Snapbot pop-up vending machine location in Venice Beach. We got the chance to speak to a few of those lucky enough to have grabbed some today, and they told us what it’s like to use the clip capturing face wear.

Jameson Detweiler, co-founder and CEO of AR startup Fantasmo.io, shared his pics and video of what it’s like to buy Spectacles from Snapchat’s adorable vending bot, and also shared some of this thoughts with TC about using them via email:

So I’m not a huge Snapchat user, but I’m building an AR startup, so clearly I need to be playing with these. And they’re a blast. I actually think this is going to get me to use Snapchat more.

They’re about as simple as possible. You pair them with your iPhone over Bluetooth. Just point them at the QR code on your phone. Then you give them a name. Once that’s done, put them on, tap the button, and it records 10 seconds of video. The LED lights spin while you’re recording. HD video requires you to set up wifi to import.

Specs has a dedicated button on the camera screen underneath the main photo button. Tapping it takes you to the Specs section of Memories. Everything syncs up pretty quickly (in SD over Bluetooth). You can pick a Story and then edit it with stickers, 3D stickers, text, etc. It doesn’t look like you can do any Lenses, including World Lenses, which makes sense because those are activated before you shoot on the regular Snapchat.

The circular video is super cool. Being able to rotate your phone and see more is pretty awesome.

 

 

 

 

 

Snap’s Spectacles are having a spectacular debut today, with (at least) hundreds of people lining up at their first Snapbot pop-up vending machine location in Venice Beach. We got the chance to speak to a few of those lucky enough to have grabbed some today, and they told us what it’s like to use the clip capturing face wear.

Jameson Detweiler, co-founder and CEO of AR startup Fantasmo.io, shared his pics and video of what it’s like to buy Spectacles from Snapchat’s adorable vending bot, and also shared some of this thoughts with TC about using them via email:

So I’m not a huge Snapchat user, but I’m building an AR startup, so clearly I need to be playing with these. And they’re a blast. I actually think this is going to get me to use Snapchat more.

They’re about as simple as possible. You pair them with your iPhone over Bluetooth. Just point them at the QR code on your phone. Then you give them a name. Once that’s done, put them on, tap the button, and it records 10 seconds of video. The LED lights spin while you’re recording. HD video requires you to set up wifi to import.

Specs has a dedicated button on the camera screen underneath the main photo button. Tapping it takes you to the Specs section of Memories. Everything syncs up pretty quickly (in SD over Bluetooth). You can pick a Story and then edit it with stickers, 3D stickers, text, etc. It doesn’t look like you can do any Lenses, including World Lenses, which makes sense because those are activated before you shoot on the regular Snapchat.

The circular video is super cool. Being able to rotate your phone and see more is pretty awesome.

Johnny Martin, an LA-based cameraman, found setup and use equally easy, and had the following thoughts about Spectacle’s potential now and in the future:

 

So [Spectacles are] extremely easy to use –  press a button and it records. It feels like it will be second nature for people who wear them consistently. There’s no friction, very simple.

Watching the footage back just feels like watching a memory because of the wide-angle lens. It’s similar to a GoPro (obviously lower resolution), but it also removes the camera from being in front of what you are looking at. So in a way, you get more of the real experience and it removes the phone from being in front of your face, too.

If you’re at a concert or the beach or wherever, there is nothing between you and the moment. Friction is gone, and the moment is much more raw and real, which has always lent itself better to Snapchat vs. Instagram, etc.

Snap is smart to have made it a toy and relatively affordable. Even on their Twitter account they are retweeting people making fun of it. They’re keeping it light, not taking themselves seriously (look at the vending machine for the Spectacles) and just having fun. That removes any stigma, as it should be about fun anyway – which is where Google Glass failed in part.

The potential of the tech is what is really fascinating: imagine an iteration or two from now where the camera is always recording and buffering and you press the button to save what you just saw. You don’t always have a camera on you to capture moments that happen or it’s too late by the time you pull your phone out, but in theory you could always just press a button to lock down a moment.

These buffers exist in cameras used for news/documentaries/etc. That hardware basically just has a set amount of storage that constantly records (if you have the setting turned on), and when whatever moment happens you’re waiting to capture, you just press record and it’s saved. That could lead some to picture to the scary dystopian future often seen in movies, of cameras everywhere recording everything all the time, but in reality i think we are probably headed in that direction regardless.

Spectacles are designed as a toy and made for fun, and that’s the way a lot of good tech starts out. Time will tell how much they stick, but the way Snap seems to be handling this rollout feels good. They aren’t taking themselves too seriously and that makes people more comfortable with the product and their vision as a camera company.

Martin’s appraisal of Snap’s approach to this rollout is spot on; it’s keeping everything about the product, from design, to use, to distribution, light and breezy. It’s on brand and it’s a clever and decidedly fresh way to do a hardware product launch in the era of the grand Apple keynote.

We’ll have more first-hand impressions of Spectacles coming up shortly, but for now it sounds like the company did what it set out to do pretty nicely.Snap’s Spectacles are having a spectacular debut today, with (at least) hundreds of people lining up at their first Snapbot pop-up vending machine location in Venice Beach. We got the chance to speak to a few of those lucky enough to have grabbed some today, and they told us what it’s like to use the clip capturing face wear.

Jameson Detweiler, co-founder and CEO of AR startup Fantasmo.io, shared his pics and video of what it’s like to buy Spectacles from Snapchat’s adorable vending bot, and also shared some of this thoughts with TC about using them via email:

So I’m not a huge Snapchat user, but I’m building an AR startup, so clearly I need to be playing with these. And they’re a blast. I actually think this is going to get me to use Snapchat more.

They’re about as simple as possible. You pair them with your iPhone over Bluetooth. Just point them at the QR code on your phone. Then you give them a name. Once that’s done, put them on, tap the button, and it records 10 seconds of video. The LED lights spin while you’re recording. HD video requires you to set up wifi to import.

Specs has a dedicated button on the camera screen underneath the main photo button. Tapping it takes you to the Specs section of Memories. Everything syncs up pretty quickly (in SD over Bluetooth). You can pick a Story and then edit it with stickers, 3D stickers, text, etc. It doesn’t look like you can do any Lenses, including World Lenses, which makes sense because those are activated before you shoot on the regular Snapchat.

The circular video is super cool. Being able to rotate your phone and see more is pretty awesome.

 

Johnny Martin, an LA-based cameraman, found setup and use equally easy, and had the following thoughts about Spectacle’s potential now and in the future:

 

So [Spectacles are] extremely easy to use –  press a button and it records. It feels like it will be second nature for people who wear them consistently. There’s no friction, very simple.

Watching the footage back just feels like watching a memory because of the wide-angle lens. It’s similar to a GoPro (obviously lower resolution), but it also removes the camera from being in front of what you are looking at. So in a way, you get more of the real experience and it removes the phone from being in front of your face, too.

If you’re at a concert or the beach or wherever, there is nothing between you and the moment. Friction is gone, and the moment is much more raw and real, which has always lent itself better to Snapchat vs. Instagram, etc.

Snap is smart to have made it a toy and relatively affordable. Even on their Twitter account they are retweeting people making fun of it. They’re keeping it light, not taking themselves seriously (look at the vending machine for the Spectacles) and just having fun. That removes any stigma, as it should be about fun anyway – which is where Google Glass failed in part.

The potential of the tech is what is really fascinating: imagine an iteration or two from now where the camera is always recording and buffering and you press the button to save what you just saw. You don’t always have a camera on you to capture moments that happen or it’s too late by the time you pull your phone out, but in theory you could always just press a button to lock down a moment.

These buffers exist in cameras used for news/documentaries/etc. That hardware basically just has a set amount of storage that constantly records (if you have the setting turned on), and when whatever moment happens you’re waiting to capture, you just press record and it’s saved. That could lead some to picture to the scary dystopian future often seen in movies, of cameras everywhere recording everything all the time, but in reality i think we are probably headed in that direction regardless.

Spectacles are designed as a toy and made for fun, and that’s the way a lot of good tech starts out. Time will tell how much they stick, but the way Snap seems to be handling this rollout feels good. They aren’t taking themselves too seriously and that makes people more comfortable with the product and their vision as a camera company.

Martin’s appraisal of Snap’s approach to this rollout is spot on; it’s keeping everything about the product, from design, to use, to distribution, light and breezy. It’s on brand and it’s a clever and decidedly fresh way to do a hardware product launch in the era of the grand Apple keynote.

We’ll have more first-hand impressions of Spectacles coming up shortly, but for now it sounds like the company did what it set out to do pretty nicely.

 

 

 

 

 

Snap’s Spectacles are having a spectacular debut today, with (at least) hundreds of people lining up at their first Snapbot pop-up vending machine location in Venice Beach. We got the chance to speak to a few of those lucky enough to have grabbed some today, and they told us what it’s like to use the clip capturing face wear.

Jameson Detweiler, co-founder and CEO of AR startup Fantasmo.io, shared his pics and video of what it’s like to buy Spectacles from Snapchat’s adorable vending bot, and also shared some of this thoughts with TC about using them via email:

So I’m not a huge Snapchat user, but I’m building an AR startup, so clearly I need to be playing with these. And they’re a blast. I actually think this is going to get me to use Snapchat more.

They’re about as simple as possible. You pair them with your iPhone over Bluetooth. Just point them at the QR code on your phone. Then you give them a name. Once that’s done, put them on, tap the button, and it records 10 seconds of video. The LED lights spin while you’re recording. HD video requires you to set up wifi to import.

Specs has a dedicated button on the camera screen underneath the main photo button. Tapping it takes you to the Specs section of Memories. Everything syncs up pretty quickly (in SD over Bluetooth). You can pick a Story and then edit it with stickers, 3D stickers, text, etc. It doesn’t look like you can do any Lenses, including World Lenses, which makes sense because those are activated before you shoot on the regular Snapchat.

The circular video is super cool. Being able to rotate your phone and see more is pretty awesome.

 

 

 

 

 

Snap’s Spectacles are having a spectacular debut today, with (at least) hundreds of people lining up at their first Snapbot pop-up vending machine location in Venice Beach. We got the chance to speak to a few of those lucky enough to have grabbed some today, and they told us what it’s like to use the clip capturing face wear.

Jameson Detweiler, co-founder and CEO of AR startup Fantasmo.io, shared his pics and video of what it’s like to buy Spectacles from Snapchat’s adorable vending bot, and also shared some of this thoughts with TC about using them via email:

So I’m not a huge Snapchat user, but I’m building an AR startup, so clearly I need to be playing with these. And they’re a blast. I actually think this is going to get me to use Snapchat more.

They’re about as simple as possible. You pair them with your iPhone over Bluetooth. Just point them at the QR code on your phone. Then you give them a name. Once that’s done, put them on, tap the button, and it records 10 seconds of video. The LED lights spin while you’re recording. HD video requires you to set up wifi to import.

Specs has a dedicated button on the camera screen underneath the main photo button. Tapping it takes you to the Specs section of Memories. Everything syncs up pretty quickly (in SD over Bluetooth). You can pick a Story and then edit it with stickers, 3D stickers, text, etc. It doesn’t look like you can do any Lenses, including World Lenses, which makes sense because those are activated before you shoot on the regular Snapchat.

The circular video is super cool. Being able to rotate your phone and see more is pretty awesome.

Johnny Martin, an LA-based cameraman, found setup and use equally easy, and had the following thoughts about Spectacle’s potential now and in the future:

 

So [Spectacles are] extremely easy to use –  press a button and it records. It feels like it will be second nature for people who wear them consistently. There’s no friction, very simple.

Watching the footage back just feels like watching a memory because of the wide-angle lens. It’s similar to a GoPro (obviously lower resolution), but it also removes the camera from being in front of what you are looking at. So in a way, you get more of the real experience and it removes the phone from being in front of your face, too.

If you’re at a concert or the beach or wherever, there is nothing between you and the moment. Friction is gone, and the moment is much more raw and real, which has always lent itself better to Snapchat vs. Instagram, etc.

Snap is smart to have made it a toy and relatively affordable. Even on their Twitter account they are retweeting people making fun of it. They’re keeping it light, not taking themselves seriously (look at the vending machine for the Spectacles) and just having fun. That removes any stigma, as it should be about fun anyway – which is where Google Glass failed in part.

The potential of the tech is what is really fascinating: imagine an iteration or two from now where the camera is always recording and buffering and you press the button to save what you just saw. You don’t always have a camera on you to capture moments that happen or it’s too late by the time you pull your phone out, but in theory you could always just press a button to lock down a moment.

These buffers exist in cameras used for news/documentaries/etc. That hardware basically just has a set amount of storage that constantly records (if you have the setting turned on), and when whatever moment happens you’re waiting to capture, you just press record and it’s saved. That could lead some to picture to the scary dystopian future often seen in movies, of cameras everywhere recording everything all the time, but in reality i think we are probably headed in that direction regardless.

Spectacles are designed as a toy and made for fun, and that’s the way a lot of good tech starts out. Time will tell how much they stick, but the way Snap seems to be handling this rollout feels good. They aren’t taking themselves too seriously and that makes people more comfortable with the product and their vision as a camera company.

Martin’s appraisal of Snap’s approach to this rollout is spot on; it’s keeping everything about the product, from design, to use, to distribution, light and breezy. It’s on brand and it’s a clever and decidedly fresh way to do a hardware product launch in the era of the grand Apple keynote.

We’ll have more first-hand impressions of Spectacles coming up shortly, but for now it sounds like the company did what it set out to do pretty nicely.Snap’s Spectacles are having a spectacular debut today, with (at least) hundreds of people lining up at their first Snapbot pop-up vending machine location in Venice Beach. We got the chance to speak to a few of those lucky enough to have grabbed some today, and they told us what it’s like to use the clip capturing face wear.

Jameson Detweiler, co-founder and CEO of AR startup Fantasmo.io, shared his pics and video of what it’s like to buy Spectacles from Snapchat’s adorable vending bot, and also shared some of this thoughts with TC about using them via email:

So I’m not a huge Snapchat user, but I’m building an AR startup, so clearly I need to be playing with these. And they’re a blast. I actually think this is going to get me to use Snapchat more.

They’re about as simple as possible. You pair them with your iPhone over Bluetooth. Just point them at the QR code on your phone. Then you give them a name. Once that’s done, put them on, tap the button, and it records 10 seconds of video. The LED lights spin while you’re recording. HD video requires you to set up wifi to import.

Specs has a dedicated button on the camera screen underneath the main photo button. Tapping it takes you to the Specs section of Memories. Everything syncs up pretty quickly (in SD over Bluetooth). You can pick a Story and then edit it with stickers, 3D stickers, text, etc. It doesn’t look like you can do any Lenses, including World Lenses, which makes sense because those are activated before you shoot on the regular Snapchat.

The circular video is super cool. Being able to rotate your phone and see more is pretty awesome.

 

Johnny Martin, an LA-based cameraman, found setup and use equally easy, and had the following thoughts about Spectacle’s potential now and in the future:

 

So [Spectacles are] extremely easy to use –  press a button and it records. It feels like it will be second nature for people who wear them consistently. There’s no friction, very simple.

Watching the footage back just feels like watching a memory because of the wide-angle lens. It’s similar to a GoPro (obviously lower resolution), but it also removes the camera from being in front of what you are looking at. So in a way, you get more of the real experience and it removes the phone from being in front of your face, too.

If you’re at a concert or the beach or wherever, there is nothing between you and the moment. Friction is gone, and the moment is much more raw and real, which has always lent itself better to Snapchat vs. Instagram, etc.

Snap is smart to have made it a toy and relatively affordable. Even on their Twitter account they are retweeting people making fun of it. They’re keeping it light, not taking themselves seriously (look at the vending machine for the Spectacles) and just having fun. That removes any stigma, as it should be about fun anyway – which is where Google Glass failed in part.

The potential of the tech is what is really fascinating: imagine an iteration or two from now where the camera is always recording and buffering and you press the button to save what you just saw. You don’t always have a camera on you to capture moments that happen or it’s too late by the time you pull your phone out, but in theory you could always just press a button to lock down a moment.

These buffers exist in cameras used for news/documentaries/etc. That hardware basically just has a set amount of storage that constantly records (if you have the setting turned on), and when whatever moment happens you’re waiting to capture, you just press record and it’s saved. That could lead some to picture to the scary dystopian future often seen in movies, of cameras everywhere recording everything all the time, but in reality i think we are probably headed in that direction regardless.

Spectacles are designed as a toy and made for fun, and that’s the way a lot of good tech starts out. Time will tell how much they stick, but the way Snap seems to be handling this rollout feels good. They aren’t taking themselves too seriously and that makes people more comfortable with the product and their vision as a camera company.

Martin’s appraisal of Snap’s approach to this rollout is spot on; it’s keeping everything about the product, from design, to use, to distribution, light and breezy. It’s on brand and it’s a clever and decidedly fresh way to do a hardware product launch in the era of the grand Apple keynote.

We’ll have more first-hand impressions of Spectacles coming up shortly, but for now it sounds like the company did what it set out to do pretty nicely.

 

 

 

 

 

Snap’s Spectacles are having a spectacular debut today, with (at least) hundreds of people lining up at their first Snapbot pop-up vending machine location in Venice Beach. We got the chance to speak to a few of those lucky enough to have grabbed some today, and they told us what it’s like to use the clip capturing face wear.

Jameson Detweiler, co-founder and CEO of AR startup Fantasmo.io, shared his pics and video of what it’s like to buy Spectacles from Snapchat’s adorable vending bot, and also shared some of this thoughts with TC about using them via email:

So I’m not a huge Snapchat user, but I’m building an AR startup, so clearly I need to be playing with these. And they’re a blast. I actually think this is going to get me to use Snapchat more.

They’re about as simple as possible. You pair them with your iPhone over Bluetooth. Just point them at the QR code on your phone. Then you give them a name. Once that’s done, put them on, tap the button, and it records 10 seconds of video. The LED lights spin while you’re recording. HD video requires you to set up wifi to import.

Specs has a dedicated button on the camera screen underneath the main photo button. Tapping it takes you to the Specs section of Memories. Everything syncs up pretty quickly (in SD over Bluetooth). You can pick a Story and then edit it with stickers, 3D stickers, text, etc. It doesn’t look like you can do any Lenses, including World Lenses, which makes sense because those are activated before you shoot on the regular Snapchat.

The circular video is super cool. Being able to rotate your phone and see more is pretty awesome.

 

 

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