This is the seventh post in our series: Discover Korea’s Tech, 

where we will talk to a mix of Korean startup entrepreneurs 

who stood their own ground with their technology, 

in Korea’s economy notoriously dominated by gigantic companies. 

 

Stay tuned over the coming month as we talk to Korean entrepreneurs. 

You can follow our updates @technodechina for new stories in the series. 

Cyber security is an increasingly important issue. 

Large companies have played victim to some very public attacks; 

Sony Pictures Entertainment was the victim of a cyber attack in November 2014 

that revealed personal information of its employees. 

 

Target also discoverd malware on its point-of-sale systems in December 2013.

According to a Raicati Email Statistics Report released in 2015, 

77 percent of all malware are installed via email. 

 

39% of total malware installations were from attached files in the email 

with 34% coming from embedded links in the email.

“Many Mac users think they are safe, but they are also vulnerable to cyber attacks. 

Same goes for Gmail users. 

If you leave it on default, it detects the malware, but if you change encoding, 

it is vulnerable to malware attacks,” CEO of SecuLetter, Chasung Lim told TechNode.

SecuLetter protects the email server from advanced attacks 

and cloud services to protect email server, 

using Hybrid Analysis method to detect and block cyber attacks.

 

“If an antivirus software detected a cyber attack, it means that the attack is already well-known.

New kinds of attack such as spear phishing, ransomware, and other targeted attacks 

can get through existing security solutions and penetrate a company’s security layer,” Mr. Lim says.

SecuLetter’s SLE detection automatizes reverse engineering. 

When a user receives an email, the company will open the email in the operating system 

and analyze attached files on the assembly level. 

After quarantining and blocking malware emails, it sends safe emails to the email server.

SecuLetter’s first trial provides cloud services 

and charges the usage on a monthly basis to reduce the cost burden.

“Other APT attack solutions cost more. 

You need to purchase all the equipment first, which requires high upfront investment,” Mr. Lim added. 

The main competitor in APT attack solution market is FireEye, a publicly listed cyber security company.

“Korea’s biggest retailer company conducted BMT (Benchmarking Test) comparing FireEye’s solution and SecuLetter’s. 

According to their test, SecuLetter detected malware with a higher percentage than FireEye,” Mr. Lim stated. 

“Our solution has a higher detection accuracy than sandbox-based APT attack solution 

because we have proprietary technology, specializing in Non-PE email content.”

 

The company raised 2 billion KRW ($1.7 million USD) last month, 

led by Korea Investment and UTC Investment

SecuLetter is supported by K-ICT Born2Global Center, 

a major Korean government agency under the Ministry of Science, 

ICT and Future Planning (MSIP).

 

 

Image Credit: SecuLetter

 


http://technode.com/2016/11/25/company-opens-malicious-email-files-dont/

 

 

This is the eighth post in our series: 

Discover Korea’s Tech, where we will talk to a mix of Korean startup entrepreneurs 

who stood their own ground with their technology, 

in Korea’s economy notoriously dominated by gigantic companies. 

Stay tuned over the coming month as we talk to Korean entrepreneurs. 

You can follow our updates @technodechina for new stories in the series.

 

When the Sewol ferry capsized, it took 304 souls with it. 

This raised awareness of safety in every sector and every industry in the country after. 

China has also seen many industrial accidents over the past few decades, 

including factory explosions and mudslides. 

Unfortunately, it is common for safety managers to often inspect the site as a mere formality, 

leading to higher chances of accidents, injuries, and fatalities.

 

Great Safety Information Laboratory (GSiL) aims to solve this problem 

by providing an AI-powered safety management system for safety managers.

 

“There has been some startups in the safety sector. 

However, it was hard for them to customize their solution 

to all different situations,” CEO of GSiL, Elisha Lee told TechNode.

 

To prevent accidents, GSiL collects tens of thousand of data points 

from environmental sensors and equipment. 

They have come up with AI-powered risk metrics and a safety system 

that monitors the location of workers and checks equipment using NFC tags. 

This allows wireless Internet to work on construction sites and tunnels.

 

GSiL differentiates itself from other safety solutions 

by allowing for a large degree of customization, 

depending on the scale of the construction site.

 

For example, when workers are digging a tunnel, 

the manager can see who’s in charge of it. 

On the top of the tunnel, GSiL installs an antenna and wireless CCTV cameras inside the tunnel. 

When working inside the tunnel, 

managers can check where all the big equipment and workers are and check their work. 

The Korean company embeds a sensor in safety hats 

so that it can notify the server when a worker falls down. 

If the worker is likely to be hurt or cause another accident, he will be marked yellow.

 

“Small construction sites have more accidents then bigger construction sites 

because they don’t have to hire a safety manager. 

They easily ignore safety measures, increasing the possibility of accident occurrence,” Mr. Lee says.

 

China saw total investments in smart cities that 260 billion USD by the end of 2015, 

according to data from the China Academy of ICT (CAICT). 

Smart city planners care about safety, public energy and its impact on residents. 

GSiL aims to provide its safety solution for Chinese local governments working with smart cities.

 

GSiL is also aware of the importance of the search after an accident occurs.

 

“When there is an accident, firefighters need to know 

if the accident is at a chemical factory or a construction site with 300 workers or 20 workers. 

We set up assistance guidelines for rescuers so that they can prepare the rescue work 

that corresponds to the scale of the accident,” Mr. Lee says.

 

Their main competitor is Norway-based DNVGL, a consulting company focused on safety. 

GSiL doesn’t have any clients from overseas yet, 

but they have said they see potential partnerships with rail alliances and fire stations. 

GSiL has already scooped 400 million KRW (340,000 USD) seed round investment from BigBang Angels.

 

GSiL is supported by K-ICT Born2Global Center

a major Korean government agency under the Ministry of Science, 

ICT and Future Planning (MSIP).

 

 

Image Credit: GSiL

 

 

http://technode.com/2016/11/25/ai-company-wants-prevent-accidents-construction-sites/ 

 

 

Image Credit: VisualCamp

 

This is the fourth post in our series: Discover Korea’s Tech, 

 

 

where we will talk to a mix of Korean startup entrepreneurs 

who stood their own ground with their technology, 

in Korea’s economy notoriously dominated by gigantic companies. 

Stay tuned over the coming month as we talk to Korean entrepreneurs. 

You can follow our updates @technodechina for new stories in the series.

 

The big debate around virtual reality is how we monetize on it. 

VR advertisement is seen as a one way to monetize VR content, 

but it is unclear how much the ad will gain traction from viewers. 

Korea-based VisualCamp has a solution to advertisers 

who wants to measure how effective a VR ad is. 

The company has developed a technology 

that enables users to input signals with their gaze in VR.

 

“VR content should take off before we talk about VR advertisement, of course. 

VR advertisement follows the VR content boom,” Charles Seok, 

co-founder and CEO of VisualCamp says. 

“Once we have eye-tracking technology, it will drive the VR advertisement market closer.”


Main competitors include Japan-based startup Fove,EyeTribe, EyeFluence and SMI. 

EyeFluence, the eye-tracking company was acquired by Google last month. 

Charles points out that other eye tracking companies are focused on PC-based VR headset, 

which will limit its reach because of its high price. 

VisualCamp says its technology is more affordable and accessible 

since it supports mobile-based VR headset both supporting Android and All-in-one type. 

“We developed an eye-tracking algorithm that occupies CPU lower than 10%,” Charles says.

“VR advertisement market will take off on mobile-based VR. 

Since smartphone-based VR headsets are rather affordable to customers, 

it will get a lot of paid advertisement,” Charles says. 

 

“PC-based VR advertisement market will come in slower, 

since PC-based VR HMD is still too expensive.”

 

 

Eye-tracking technology adopted in different sectors

 

“In the commerce sector, advertisers can figure out 

if a viewer would purchase the item or not in 3D shopping malls, 

using VisualCamp’s eye tracking solution,” Charles says. 

For example, when brand products are used in a 360 movie, 

the company can measure how effective is the brand’s advertisement on different scenes.

 

The prediction is about 75% accurate in the current stage, 

which the company looks to raise its accuracy as high as 90%, 

as they develop through their technology. 

The technology can also find out 

if the viewers feel the advertisement model is appealing to them or not, using the gaze analysis.

 

“When VR commerce, say, Alibaba’s BUY+ is realized, 

eye tracking technology can actually help increase purchase conversion rate,” Charles says. 

“When a user’s likeliness of purchasing the item is high, 

then the company can send out a coupon.”


The technology has other possibilities to be applied to other sectors 

such as games, education, 360 movies, advertisements, and research.


“In a poker game, you will notice if the guy next to you is a professional or not. 

In education sector, you will notice if the person is illiterate or not using gaze analysis,” Charles says.

 

The Korean company is working with Chinese VR company Nibiru

a Nanjing-based company that develops 2K virtual reality headset solution 

to bring in its technology to China. 

Its competitor Fove has received funding from Samsung Ventures last year.

 

“In China, all the VR components, like software, hardware are moving forward. 

South Korea has a strong content base and technology, 

but consumers and companies are still slow in adapting VR,” Charles says.

 

VisualCamp was selected by Red Herring 

as one of the most innovative 100 technology startups in Asia this year. 

The company is supported by K-ICT Born2Global Center

a major Korean government agency under the Ministry of Science, 

ICT and Future Planning (MSIP).


 

http://technode.com/2016/11/16/discover-koreas-tech-visualcamp-eye-tracking-company-for-vr-ads-monetization/



 

This is the seventh post in our series: Discover Korea’s Tech, 

where we will talk to a mix of Korean startup entrepreneurs 

who stood their own ground with their technology, 

in Korea’s economy notoriously dominated by gigantic companies. 

 

Stay tuned over the coming month as we talk to Korean entrepreneurs. 

You can follow our updates @technodechina for new stories in the series. 

Cyber security is an increasingly important issue. 

Large companies have played victim to some very public attacks; 

Sony Pictures Entertainment was the victim of a cyber attack in November 2014 

that revealed personal information of its employees. 

 

Target also discoverd malware on its point-of-sale systems in December 2013.

According to a Raicati Email Statistics Report released in 2015, 

77 percent of all malware are installed via email. 

 

39% of total malware installations were from attached files in the email 

with 34% coming from embedded links in the email.

“Many Mac users think they are safe, but they are also vulnerable to cyber attacks. 

Same goes for Gmail users. 

If you leave it on default, it detects the malware, but if you change encoding, 

it is vulnerable to malware attacks,” CEO of SecuLetter, Chasung Lim told TechNode.

SecuLetter protects the email server from advanced attacks 

and cloud services to protect email server, 

using Hybrid Analysis method to detect and block cyber attacks.

 

“If an antivirus software detected a cyber attack, it means that the attack is already well-known.

New kinds of attack such as spear phishing, ransomware, and other targeted attacks 

can get through existing security solutions and penetrate a company’s security layer,” Mr. Lim says.

SecuLetter’s SLE detection automatizes reverse engineering. 

When a user receives an email, the company will open the email in the operating system 

and analyze attached files on the assembly level. 

After quarantining and blocking malware emails, it sends safe emails to the email server.

SecuLetter’s first trial provides cloud services 

and charges the usage on a monthly basis to reduce the cost burden.

“Other APT attack solutions cost more. 

You need to purchase all the equipment first, which requires high upfront investment,” Mr. Lim added. 

The main competitor in APT attack solution market is FireEye, a publicly listed cyber security company.

“Korea’s biggest retailer company conducted BMT (Benchmarking Test) comparing FireEye’s solution and SecuLetter’s. 

According to their test, SecuLetter detected malware with a higher percentage than FireEye,” Mr. Lim stated. 

“Our solution has a higher detection accuracy than sandbox-based APT attack solution 

because we have proprietary technology, specializing in Non-PE email content.”

 

The company raised 2 billion KRW ($1.7 million USD) last month, 

led by Korea Investment and UTC Investment

SecuLetter is supported by K-ICT Born2Global Center, 

a major Korean government agency under the Ministry of Science, 

ICT and Future Planning (MSIP).

 

 

Image Credit: SecuLetter

 


http://technode.com/2016/11/25/company-opens-malicious-email-files-dont/

 

 

This is the eighth post in our series: 

Discover Korea’s Tech, where we will talk to a mix of Korean startup entrepreneurs 

who stood their own ground with their technology, 

in Korea’s economy notoriously dominated by gigantic companies. 

Stay tuned over the coming month as we talk to Korean entrepreneurs. 

You can follow our updates @technodechina for new stories in the series.

 

When the Sewol ferry capsized, it took 304 souls with it. 

This raised awareness of safety in every sector and every industry in the country after. 

China has also seen many industrial accidents over the past few decades, 

including factory explosions and mudslides. 

Unfortunately, it is common for safety managers to often inspect the site as a mere formality, 

leading to higher chances of accidents, injuries, and fatalities.

 

Great Safety Information Laboratory (GSiL) aims to solve this problem 

by providing an AI-powered safety management system for safety managers.

 

“There has been some startups in the safety sector. 

However, it was hard for them to customize their solution 

to all different situations,” CEO of GSiL, Elisha Lee told TechNode.

 

To prevent accidents, GSiL collects tens of thousand of data points 

from environmental sensors and equipment. 

They have come up with AI-powered risk metrics and a safety system 

that monitors the location of workers and checks equipment using NFC tags. 

This allows wireless Internet to work on construction sites and tunnels.

 

GSiL differentiates itself from other safety solutions 

by allowing for a large degree of customization, 

depending on the scale of the construction site.

 

For example, when workers are digging a tunnel, 

the manager can see who’s in charge of it. 

On the top of the tunnel, GSiL installs an antenna and wireless CCTV cameras inside the tunnel. 

When working inside the tunnel, 

managers can check where all the big equipment and workers are and check their work. 

The Korean company embeds a sensor in safety hats 

so that it can notify the server when a worker falls down. 

If the worker is likely to be hurt or cause another accident, he will be marked yellow.

 

“Small construction sites have more accidents then bigger construction sites 

because they don’t have to hire a safety manager. 

They easily ignore safety measures, increasing the possibility of accident occurrence,” Mr. Lee says.

 

China saw total investments in smart cities that 260 billion USD by the end of 2015, 

according to data from the China Academy of ICT (CAICT). 

Smart city planners care about safety, public energy and its impact on residents. 

GSiL aims to provide its safety solution for Chinese local governments working with smart cities.

 

GSiL is also aware of the importance of the search after an accident occurs.

 

“When there is an accident, firefighters need to know 

if the accident is at a chemical factory or a construction site with 300 workers or 20 workers. 

We set up assistance guidelines for rescuers so that they can prepare the rescue work 

that corresponds to the scale of the accident,” Mr. Lee says.

 

Their main competitor is Norway-based DNVGL, a consulting company focused on safety. 

GSiL doesn’t have any clients from overseas yet, 

but they have said they see potential partnerships with rail alliances and fire stations. 

GSiL has already scooped 400 million KRW (340,000 USD) seed round investment from BigBang Angels.

 

GSiL is supported by K-ICT Born2Global Center

a major Korean government agency under the Ministry of Science, 

ICT and Future Planning (MSIP).

 

 

Image Credit: GSiL

 

 

http://technode.com/2016/11/25/ai-company-wants-prevent-accidents-construction-sites/ 

 

 

Image Credit: VisualCamp

 

This is the fourth post in our series: Discover Korea’s Tech, 

 

 

where we will talk to a mix of Korean startup entrepreneurs 

who stood their own ground with their technology, 

in Korea’s economy notoriously dominated by gigantic companies. 

Stay tuned over the coming month as we talk to Korean entrepreneurs. 

You can follow our updates @technodechina for new stories in the series.

 

The big debate around virtual reality is how we monetize on it. 

VR advertisement is seen as a one way to monetize VR content, 

but it is unclear how much the ad will gain traction from viewers. 

Korea-based VisualCamp has a solution to advertisers 

who wants to measure how effective a VR ad is. 

The company has developed a technology 

that enables users to input signals with their gaze in VR.

 

“VR content should take off before we talk about VR advertisement, of course. 

VR advertisement follows the VR content boom,” Charles Seok, 

co-founder and CEO of VisualCamp says. 

“Once we have eye-tracking technology, it will drive the VR advertisement market closer.”


Main competitors include Japan-based startup Fove,EyeTribe, EyeFluence and SMI. 

EyeFluence, the eye-tracking company was acquired by Google last month. 

Charles points out that other eye tracking companies are focused on PC-based VR headset, 

which will limit its reach because of its high price. 

VisualCamp says its technology is more affordable and accessible 

since it supports mobile-based VR headset both supporting Android and All-in-one type. 

“We developed an eye-tracking algorithm that occupies CPU lower than 10%,” Charles says.

“VR advertisement market will take off on mobile-based VR. 

Since smartphone-based VR headsets are rather affordable to customers, 

it will get a lot of paid advertisement,” Charles says. 

 

“PC-based VR advertisement market will come in slower, 

since PC-based VR HMD is still too expensive.”

 

 

Eye-tracking technology adopted in different sectors

 

“In the commerce sector, advertisers can figure out 

if a viewer would purchase the item or not in 3D shopping malls, 

using VisualCamp’s eye tracking solution,” Charles says. 

For example, when brand products are used in a 360 movie, 

the company can measure how effective is the brand’s advertisement on different scenes.

 

The prediction is about 75% accurate in the current stage, 

which the company looks to raise its accuracy as high as 90%, 

as they develop through their technology. 

The technology can also find out 

if the viewers feel the advertisement model is appealing to them or not, using the gaze analysis.

 

“When VR commerce, say, Alibaba’s BUY+ is realized, 

eye tracking technology can actually help increase purchase conversion rate,” Charles says. 

“When a user’s likeliness of purchasing the item is high, 

then the company can send out a coupon.”


The technology has other possibilities to be applied to other sectors 

such as games, education, 360 movies, advertisements, and research.


“In a poker game, you will notice if the guy next to you is a professional or not. 

In education sector, you will notice if the person is illiterate or not using gaze analysis,” Charles says.

 

The Korean company is working with Chinese VR company Nibiru

a Nanjing-based company that develops 2K virtual reality headset solution 

to bring in its technology to China. 

Its competitor Fove has received funding from Samsung Ventures last year.

 

“In China, all the VR components, like software, hardware are moving forward. 

South Korea has a strong content base and technology, 

but consumers and companies are still slow in adapting VR,” Charles says.

 

VisualCamp was selected by Red Herring 

as one of the most innovative 100 technology startups in Asia this year. 

The company is supported by K-ICT Born2Global Center

a major Korean government agency under the Ministry of Science, 

ICT and Future Planning (MSIP).


 

http://technode.com/2016/11/16/discover-koreas-tech-visualcamp-eye-tracking-company-for-vr-ads-monetization/



 

This is the seventh post in our series: Discover Korea’s Tech, 

where we will talk to a mix of Korean startup entrepreneurs 

who stood their own ground with their technology, 

in Korea’s economy notoriously dominated by gigantic companies. 

 

Stay tuned over the coming month as we talk to Korean entrepreneurs. 

You can follow our updates @technodechina for new stories in the series. 

Cyber security is an increasingly important issue. 

Large companies have played victim to some very public attacks; 

Sony Pictures Entertainment was the victim of a cyber attack in November 2014 

that revealed personal information of its employees. 

 

Target also discoverd malware on its point-of-sale systems in December 2013.

According to a Raicati Email Statistics Report released in 2015, 

77 percent of all malware are installed via email. 

 

39% of total malware installations were from attached files in the email 

with 34% coming from embedded links in the email.

“Many Mac users think they are safe, but they are also vulnerable to cyber attacks. 

Same goes for Gmail users. 

If you leave it on default, it detects the malware, but if you change encoding, 

it is vulnerable to malware attacks,” CEO of SecuLetter, Chasung Lim told TechNode.

SecuLetter protects the email server from advanced attacks 

and cloud services to protect email server, 

using Hybrid Analysis method to detect and block cyber attacks.

 

“If an antivirus software detected a cyber attack, it means that the attack is already well-known.

New kinds of attack such as spear phishing, ransomware, and other targeted attacks 

can get through existing security solutions and penetrate a company’s security layer,” Mr. Lim says.

SecuLetter’s SLE detection automatizes reverse engineering. 

When a user receives an email, the company will open the email in the operating system 

and analyze attached files on the assembly level. 

After quarantining and blocking malware emails, it sends safe emails to the email server.

SecuLetter’s first trial provides cloud services 

and charges the usage on a monthly basis to reduce the cost burden.

“Other APT attack solutions cost more. 

You need to purchase all the equipment first, which requires high upfront investment,” Mr. Lim added. 

The main competitor in APT attack solution market is FireEye, a publicly listed cyber security company.

“Korea’s biggest retailer company conducted BMT (Benchmarking Test) comparing FireEye’s solution and SecuLetter’s. 

According to their test, SecuLetter detected malware with a higher percentage than FireEye,” Mr. Lim stated. 

“Our solution has a higher detection accuracy than sandbox-based APT attack solution 

because we have proprietary technology, specializing in Non-PE email content.”

 

The company raised 2 billion KRW ($1.7 million USD) last month, 

led by Korea Investment and UTC Investment

SecuLetter is supported by K-ICT Born2Global Center, 

a major Korean government agency under the Ministry of Science, 

ICT and Future Planning (MSIP).

 

 

Image Credit: SecuLetter

 


http://technode.com/2016/11/25/company-opens-malicious-email-files-dont/

 

 

This is the eighth post in our series: 

Discover Korea’s Tech, where we will talk to a mix of Korean startup entrepreneurs 

who stood their own ground with their technology, 

in Korea’s economy notoriously dominated by gigantic companies. 

Stay tuned over the coming month as we talk to Korean entrepreneurs. 

You can follow our updates @technodechina for new stories in the series.

 

When the Sewol ferry capsized, it took 304 souls with it. 

This raised awareness of safety in every sector and every industry in the country after. 

China has also seen many industrial accidents over the past few decades, 

including factory explosions and mudslides. 

Unfortunately, it is common for safety managers to often inspect the site as a mere formality, 

leading to higher chances of accidents, injuries, and fatalities.

 

Great Safety Information Laboratory (GSiL) aims to solve this problem 

by providing an AI-powered safety management system for safety managers.

 

“There has been some startups in the safety sector. 

However, it was hard for them to customize their solution 

to all different situations,” CEO of GSiL, Elisha Lee told TechNode.

 

To prevent accidents, GSiL collects tens of thousand of data points 

from environmental sensors and equipment. 

They have come up with AI-powered risk metrics and a safety system 

that monitors the location of workers and checks equipment using NFC tags. 

This allows wireless Internet to work on construction sites and tunnels.

 

GSiL differentiates itself from other safety solutions 

by allowing for a large degree of customization, 

depending on the scale of the construction site.

 

For example, when workers are digging a tunnel, 

the manager can see who’s in charge of it. 

On the top of the tunnel, GSiL installs an antenna and wireless CCTV cameras inside the tunnel. 

When working inside the tunnel, 

managers can check where all the big equipment and workers are and check their work. 

The Korean company embeds a sensor in safety hats 

so that it can notify the server when a worker falls down. 

If the worker is likely to be hurt or cause another accident, he will be marked yellow.

 

“Small construction sites have more accidents then bigger construction sites 

because they don’t have to hire a safety manager. 

They easily ignore safety measures, increasing the possibility of accident occurrence,” Mr. Lee says.

 

China saw total investments in smart cities that 260 billion USD by the end of 2015, 

according to data from the China Academy of ICT (CAICT). 

Smart city planners care about safety, public energy and its impact on residents. 

GSiL aims to provide its safety solution for Chinese local governments working with smart cities.

 

GSiL is also aware of the importance of the search after an accident occurs.

 

“When there is an accident, firefighters need to know 

if the accident is at a chemical factory or a construction site with 300 workers or 20 workers. 

We set up assistance guidelines for rescuers so that they can prepare the rescue work 

that corresponds to the scale of the accident,” Mr. Lee says.

 

Their main competitor is Norway-based DNVGL, a consulting company focused on safety. 

GSiL doesn’t have any clients from overseas yet, 

but they have said they see potential partnerships with rail alliances and fire stations. 

GSiL has already scooped 400 million KRW (340,000 USD) seed round investment from BigBang Angels.

 

GSiL is supported by K-ICT Born2Global Center

a major Korean government agency under the Ministry of Science, 

ICT and Future Planning (MSIP).

 

 

Image Credit: GSiL

 

 

http://technode.com/2016/11/25/ai-company-wants-prevent-accidents-construction-sites/ 

 

 

Image Credit: VisualCamp

 

This is the fourth post in our series: Discover Korea’s Tech, 

 

 

where we will talk to a mix of Korean startup entrepreneurs 

who stood their own ground with their technology, 

in Korea’s economy notoriously dominated by gigantic companies. 

Stay tuned over the coming month as we talk to Korean entrepreneurs. 

You can follow our updates @technodechina for new stories in the series.

 

The big debate around virtual reality is how we monetize on it. 

VR advertisement is seen as a one way to monetize VR content, 

but it is unclear how much the ad will gain traction from viewers. 

Korea-based VisualCamp has a solution to advertisers 

who wants to measure how effective a VR ad is. 

The company has developed a technology 

that enables users to input signals with their gaze in VR.

 

“VR content should take off before we talk about VR advertisement, of course. 

VR advertisement follows the VR content boom,” Charles Seok, 

co-founder and CEO of VisualCamp says. 

“Once we have eye-tracking technology, it will drive the VR advertisement market closer.”


Main competitors include Japan-based startup Fove,EyeTribe, EyeFluence and SMI. 

EyeFluence, the eye-tracking company was acquired by Google last month. 

Charles points out that other eye tracking companies are focused on PC-based VR headset, 

which will limit its reach because of its high price. 

VisualCamp says its technology is more affordable and accessible 

since it supports mobile-based VR headset both supporting Android and All-in-one type. 

“We developed an eye-tracking algorithm that occupies CPU lower than 10%,” Charles says.

“VR advertisement market will take off on mobile-based VR. 

Since smartphone-based VR headsets are rather affordable to customers, 

it will get a lot of paid advertisement,” Charles says. 

 

“PC-based VR advertisement market will come in slower, 

since PC-based VR HMD is still too expensive.”

 

 

Eye-tracking technology adopted in different sectors

 

“In the commerce sector, advertisers can figure out 

if a viewer would purchase the item or not in 3D shopping malls, 

using VisualCamp’s eye tracking solution,” Charles says. 

For example, when brand products are used in a 360 movie, 

the company can measure how effective is the brand’s advertisement on different scenes.

 

The prediction is about 75% accurate in the current stage, 

which the company looks to raise its accuracy as high as 90%, 

as they develop through their technology. 

The technology can also find out 

if the viewers feel the advertisement model is appealing to them or not, using the gaze analysis.

 

“When VR commerce, say, Alibaba’s BUY+ is realized, 

eye tracking technology can actually help increase purchase conversion rate,” Charles says. 

“When a user’s likeliness of purchasing the item is high, 

then the company can send out a coupon.”


The technology has other possibilities to be applied to other sectors 

such as games, education, 360 movies, advertisements, and research.


“In a poker game, you will notice if the guy next to you is a professional or not. 

In education sector, you will notice if the person is illiterate or not using gaze analysis,” Charles says.

 

The Korean company is working with Chinese VR company Nibiru

a Nanjing-based company that develops 2K virtual reality headset solution 

to bring in its technology to China. 

Its competitor Fove has received funding from Samsung Ventures last year.

 

“In China, all the VR components, like software, hardware are moving forward. 

South Korea has a strong content base and technology, 

but consumers and companies are still slow in adapting VR,” Charles says.

 

VisualCamp was selected by Red Herring 

as one of the most innovative 100 technology startups in Asia this year. 

The company is supported by K-ICT Born2Global Center

a major Korean government agency under the Ministry of Science, 

ICT and Future Planning (MSIP).


 

http://technode.com/2016/11/16/discover-koreas-tech-visualcamp-eye-tracking-company-for-vr-ads-monetization/



 

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