The Ministry of Science and ICT has announced on the 4th that regular ‘contact-free IR briefings’ will be held starting this month among large corporations, venture capitalists, and policy financial institutions to support ventures and startups in the field of information and communication technology (ICT). 

 

These briefings, which were originally intended last year to alleviate the difficulty of attracting investments due to COVID-19, has now become a major foothold in the venture and startup investment market.

 

The Ministry of Science and ICT plans to continue providing opportunities for attracting online investments to SMEs, arranging IR briefings for the first half of the year with four investor groups for ventures and start-ups. The investor groups consist of the following categories: wireless carriers, large conglomerates, Korean VCs, and international VC/global corporations, and select ventures and startups will have the opportunity to work with the operating institutions under the supervision of the investor groups. 

 

Within the four categories, Born2Global Centre will be in charge of seeking suitable global VCs and organizations to hold 1:1 IR briefings with Korean VCs and startups to promote innovative technologies and services suitable for the international market.

 

Lee Seung-won, the Ministry of Science and ICT policy officer said, The ‘contact-free IR briefings’ with large companies and investors will provide an opportunity to attract investment and expand business opportunities for startups facing difficulties from COVID-19. With the emergence of new contact-free routines in this economy and society, various attempts are being made around the world, and our department is expanding upon such efforts with initiatives, such as the ‘contact-free IR briefings’.”

 

 

 



Four Korean ministries through 2023 will jointly pursue the development of a smart road lighting platform. (Iclickart)

Four Korean ministries through 2023 will jointly pursue the development of a smart road lighting platform. (Iclickart)


By Jung Joori and Kim Hwaya

Four ministries through 2023 will jointly pursue the development of a smart road lighting platform to prevent traffic accidents and boost driver and pedestrian safety. 

The Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport, the Ministry of Science and ICT, the Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy, and the Ministry of the Interior and Safety announced on April 1 that their project will install smart lighting with sensors that monitor potential dangers on roads. They will also conduct empirical studies with a budget of KRW 26 billion. 

Sensors on streetlamps will collect information on traffic volume, accidents, debris and icy roads through the internet of things. In addition, the devices will send digital signals to vehicles, traffic lights and crosswalks to alert drivers or pedestrians of potential danger. 

For example, if a vehicle exceeding the speed limit appears late at night, smart lighting installed on the road sends a signal to the crosswalk and turns on LED lights to alert pedestrians in the area. If the vehicle fails to slow down, a smart lighting sensor turns the traffic light to red. 

The Land Ministry said the four ministries will develop a smart streetlamp and build a testbed from 2022-23 to test its performance and effects. 

"We expect this to be an opportunity to create various added value with this test application as a Korean standard for a smart road lighting platform," the ministry added. 

etoilejr@korea.kr



Korea’s locally developed space rocket engine Korea Space Launch Vehicle-2 Nuri test-launches at the Naro Space Center in Goheung, Jeollanam-do Province on Nov. 28.

Korea’s locally developed space rocket engine Korea Space Launch Vehicle-2 Nuri test-launches at the Naro Space Center in Goheung, Jeollanam-do Province on Nov. 28.



By Min Yea-Ji and Kim Young Shin 
Photo & video = Korea Aerospace Research Institute 

Korea successfully test-launched its homegrown Korea Space Launch Vehicle-2 (KSLV-2) Nuri at the Naro Space Center in Goheung, Jeollanam-do Province on Nov. 28. The critical rocket motor combustion time was maintained for 151 seconds, which surpasses the initial goal of 140 seconds. The rocket reached its maximum suborbital altitude of 209 kilometers after flying 319 seconds. 

The 75-ton rocket engine tested on that day will be used in the second stage of the three-stage KSLV-2 Nuri. The engine was developed and built with local technology. 

“We will develop a stable space rocket with four of the 75-ton engine verified today to be clustered into a 300-ton engine for the first stage, and a 75-ton engine for the second stage and 7-ton engine for the third stage,” said 1st vice minister of Science and ICT Lee Jin-gyu. “By 2021, Korea will have a homegrown space launch vehicle.” 

“Korea’s space technology has gone up a stage today,” said Lee. 

Korea is the seventh country in the world to build an indigenous 75-ton-class space rocket engine. 

jesimin@korea.kr 









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