Edited by Hyunjin Choi

 

“Nowadays, too much screen time is threatening people’s eye health. Our priority is to protect eye health in a harmful environment with our digital vision therapy device,” said Sungyong Park, CEO of Edenlux. The company released a vision therapy product, Otus in May 2019. This goggle type-vision therapy product helps to improve the average visual acuity of people by having eye muscles exercise 5 minutes everyday. As a smart device, Otus differentiates itself from analogue products from Bernell which is a leading company in vision therapy field. The way it operates is simple. Once users wear Otus like VR glasses, it automatically analyzes the user’s eye status and provides tailored eye muscle exercises. Moreover, it weighs only 365g, which means users are able to carry it with no time and place constraints. “Those who needed better vision relied mainly on experts before, and sometimes it is a tedious and expensive process. But with Otus, people can conduct vision therapy at home in an easy way at a low cost. Our goal is to pioneer a digital vision therapy market and be a global leader,” mentioned Dr. Park.

 

Park is a medical doctor who suffered from a low vision issue after an accident. He was diagnosed with eye muscle tissues that had lost strength, which caused a vision problem. While he was discouraged from a series of failures from hospital treatments, one day he found a solution to treat his vision by training weakened eye muscles, and eventually recovered his sight after 6 months. Based on the experience, he focused on study of the vision therapy field during his clerkship at Harvard Medical School and eventually established Edenlux in June 2016. “In other countries, optometrists specializes in examining, diagnosing, and treating eye condition especially with vision therapy. In general, the vision therapy from optometrists costs $140 per hour and the special therapy device is hard to utilize without help from experts. “I thought I would stand a chance when I devised a potable vision therapy goggles that can be used without experts’ assistance,” stated Dr. Park.

 


 

Edenlux takes pride in the fact that it is the first vision therapy device converged with digital technology. Otus is compatible with a smartphone application. Once connected with the application, it conducts precise eye checkups with 10 special optic lenses embedded in the device. The result is sent to the main server, leading to a tailored vision training. Otus provides three steps of eye-enhancing programs: presbyopia and children near sightedness training, squint-eye correction training, and amblyopia training. “People can manage eye health anywhere and even discover their eye problems at an early stage,” said Dr. Park. Edenlux has a plan to verify the effectiveness of Otus through clinical trials. It started clinical tests on astigmatism in June subjected to 60 people with Dongkuk University Ilsan hospital, a major university hospital in Korea. In terms of myopia, the company is planning medical trials within this year in cooperation with Gachon University Gil Medical Center, and strabismus clinical trials at Samsung Medical Center, which are the most prestigious hospitals in Korea.

 


 

Since its launching in May, 500 units have been sold in two months. Edenlux sets its sales goal for 2019 at USD 820K and for 2020 at USD 8M, expecting to expand its customer base both in domestic and overseas markets. It obtained a good reputation in the prominent startup world forum, GES 2019 (Global Entrepreneurship Summit) held in Hague, Netherlands in June. This forum is hosted in the United States and the Netherlands and had over 2000 companies this year, including Edenlux. It also took part in CES 2019(Consumer Electronics Show) and attracted the highest number of visitors among Korean participating startups. “We saw our potential attending major global exhibitions. As our next step, we are planning to establish a branch in LA and Europe next year,” added Dr. Park.

 


 


“Vision loss is irreversible, like spilled water. However, it is preventable.”

 

Ovitz into Market for Portable, Low-Cost Eye Diagnostic Devices Rather 

than Focusing on Expensive Equipment

 

Ovitz has developed a compact, portable eye diagnostic device for people who are unable to have 

their eyes examined on a regular basis.

CEO Felix Kim studied at the a Flaum Eye Institute at the University of Rochester, in the United States. 

At first, he was interested in the development of premium eye diagnostic equipment, but changed 

his mind after participating in a public eye care program for vulnerable groups. 

In countries with low population densities, such as the United States, and developing countries that 

lack hospitals, many people have insufficient access to optometrists and ophthalmologists. 

 

 

Kim said, “When I went to urban outskirts areas to participate in the public eye care program, 

I found that most of the residents there are black or elderly people. I felt sorry for them, because 

even though they didn’t need tests or diagnoses requiring high-end equipment, they had too few 

opportunities to have their vision tested and eyes checked.” He added, “It was difficult to test the 

vision and eye health of these people using the existing eye diagnostic device, so I started developing 

a more portable and convenient device.”

 

Kim entered the portable eye diagnostic device business after winning a prize for a project that he 

had started as a part of his job and later succeeded in attracting investment to develop his idea. 

Ovitz was incorporated in the United States in November 2013 and established a Korean subsidiary 

in 2015. Kim began building his business by recruiting scientists, optical engineers, and business 

people with expertise in medical devices and experience in pharmaceutical companies. 

He said, “I did research at an optical research institute, but I found it quite difficult for a college 

student like myself to work alone and make progress in the highly specialized fields of hardware, 

high-precision optics, and medical devices.” He went onto add, “Rather than trying to acquire the 

necessary knowledge in such fields myself, I set out to find and recruit top experts in these fields to 

join my team.”

 

Compact, Fast, Portable Eye Diagnostic Device

 

 

Ovitz’s eye diagnostic device is capable of testing and diagnosing large numbers of people more 

quickly and cheaply than other much more expensive devices. Much smaller than the eye diagnostic 

instruments used in typical ophthalmology clinics and optical shops, the company’s device is about 

one-tenth the size of an adult’s fist, and it can measure the various high-order aberration information 

required for LASIK and LASEK surgery and detect vision problems, including myopia and astigmatism. 

The device is simple and easy to use for the elderly, handicapped, and children. “A member of our team 

who has a daughter with autism suddenly had the idea to test his daughter’s vision using our device.

He discovered that her eyesight was bad, so much so that she actually needed glasses,” Kim said. 

“This shows just how beneficial our eye diagnostic device can be for people with disabilities or low 

accessibility to eye care services.”

 

 

 

 

Having already completed four clinical trials, Ovitz’s portable eye diagnostic device is due to enter 

production soon, with the company planning to start selling the product in the first quarter of this year. 

Once its cloud service platform and mobile applications are complete, the company will begin focusing 

on expanding its sales volume. 

Kim said,“This year, we will work hard to make progress and increase sales while engaging in activities 

with NGOs.” He went onto explain,“By accumulating a large volume of data on eye function and health 

in the longterm, we will be able to offer blindness prevention solutions, which we will develop in cooperation 

with NGOs.”

 

Substantial Legal and Patent Support from Born2Global

 

Since its inception, even prior to the establishment of its Korean subsidiary, Ovitz has received support 

from the Born2Global Centre, especially legal consulting on how to attract greater investment and patent 

consulting on matters such as patent applications. 

Thanks to this support, the company has been able to overcome numerous challenges. Most of all, with 

Born2Global’s patent consulting services and support, Ovitz was able to gain a competitive edge early on. 

Kim said, “Patents are crucial to technology-based companies. Over the past two years, we have filed 

numerous patent applications, resulting in one registered patent so far.” He also emphasized, “Supportedby 

the expertise of Born2Global’s lawyers and patent attorneys, we wereable to concentrate on the essentials 

of our business.”

 

Ovitz to Expand into Vietnam and Cambodia

 

Ovitz also offers assistance for people with poor eyesight in developing countries, providing them access 

to eye tests and connecting them to the eye care service sand treatments they need. This year, it will launch 

a tele medicine program with NGOs in Phnom Penh and SiemReap, in Cambodia, as well as in Vietnam. 

Through these programs, Ovitz will sell its devices to its partner NGOs, check the vision and eye health of 

underprivileged people remotely, and send the information collected to hospitals so that the people may 

receive proper treatment.

 

In January last year, Ovitz, with the support of KOICA, provided telemedicine services in Bangladesh using 

its eye diagnostic device. Locals used the device to test the vision of underprivileged people and sent the 

information to hospitals for use in providing treatment. 

Kim said,“Since under privileged people with poor access to eye care often do not know whether they need 

glasses or have eye problems, we need to first educate them and then instruct them on howto access eye 

care services and treatment.” He added,“Our goal is to go beyond simply providing aid and develop this 

into a sustain able business.”

 

Large proportions of the populations of Vietnam and Cambodia have visual impairments, but many of them 

do not wear glasses. Ovitz will work with several NGOs to study the social and economic impacts of blindness 

and visual impairments in such countries. “Degradation of vision has a major negative impact on quality of life; 

yet people tend to be unaware of its importance and impact,” said Kim. 

“I think a lot of research needs to be done on, for example, how much learning efficiency would increase if 

schoolchildren with poor eyesight indeveloping countries were given eyeglasses, how much productivity would 

increase if glasses were given to workers with poor eyesight, and how much the traffic accident rate would decrease 

if glasses were given to drivers with poor eyesight.”

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Our member in this article

 

Description

Embodying an Advanced Application of Wavefront Sensor 

in a Portable Autorefractor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Vision loss is irreversible, like spilled water. However, it is preventable.”

 

Ovitz into Market for Portable, Low-Cost Eye Diagnostic Devices Rather 

than Focusing on Expensive Equipment

 

Ovitz has developed a compact, portable eye diagnostic device for people who are unable to have 

their eyes examined on a regular basis.

CEO Felix Kim studied at the a Flaum Eye Institute at the University of Rochester, in the United States. 

At first, he was interested in the development of premium eye diagnostic equipment, but changed 

his mind after participating in a public eye care program for vulnerable groups. 

In countries with low population densities, such as the United States, and developing countries that 

lack hospitals, many people have insufficient access to optometrists and ophthalmologists. 

 

 

Kim said, “When I went to urban outskirts areas to participate in the public eye care program, 

I found that most of the residents there are black or elderly people. I felt sorry for them, because 

even though they didn’t need tests or diagnoses requiring high-end equipment, they had too few 

opportunities to have their vision tested and eyes checked.” He added, “It was difficult to test the 

vision and eye health of these people using the existing eye diagnostic device, so I started developing 

a more portable and convenient device.”

 

Kim entered the portable eye diagnostic device business after winning a prize for a project that he 

had started as a part of his job and later succeeded in attracting investment to develop his idea. 

Ovitz was incorporated in the United States in November 2013 and established a Korean subsidiary 

in 2015. Kim began building his business by recruiting scientists, optical engineers, and business 

people with expertise in medical devices and experience in pharmaceutical companies. 

He said, “I did research at an optical research institute, but I found it quite difficult for a college 

student like myself to work alone and make progress in the highly specialized fields of hardware, 

high-precision optics, and medical devices.” He went onto add, “Rather than trying to acquire the 

necessary knowledge in such fields myself, I set out to find and recruit top experts in these fields to 

join my team.”

 

Compact, Fast, Portable Eye Diagnostic Device

 

 

Ovitz’s eye diagnostic device is capable of testing and diagnosing large numbers of people more 

quickly and cheaply than other much more expensive devices. Much smaller than the eye diagnostic 

instruments used in typical ophthalmology clinics and optical shops, the company’s device is about 

one-tenth the size of an adult’s fist, and it can measure the various high-order aberration information 

required for LASIK and LASEK surgery and detect vision problems, including myopia and astigmatism. 

The device is simple and easy to use for the elderly, handicapped, and children. “A member of our team 

who has a daughter with autism suddenly had the idea to test his daughter’s vision using our device.

He discovered that her eyesight was bad, so much so that she actually needed glasses,” Kim said. 

“This shows just how beneficial our eye diagnostic device can be for people with disabilities or low 

accessibility to eye care services.”

 

 

 

 

Having already completed four clinical trials, Ovitz’s portable eye diagnostic device is due to enter 

production soon, with the company planning to start selling the product in the first quarter of this year. 

Once its cloud service platform and mobile applications are complete, the company will begin focusing 

on expanding its sales volume. 

Kim said,“This year, we will work hard to make progress and increase sales while engaging in activities 

with NGOs.” He went onto explain,“By accumulating a large volume of data on eye function and health 

in the longterm, we will be able to offer blindness prevention solutions, which we will develop in cooperation 

with NGOs.”

 

Substantial Legal and Patent Support from Born2Global

 

Since its inception, even prior to the establishment of its Korean subsidiary, Ovitz has received support 

from the Born2Global Centre, especially legal consulting on how to attract greater investment and patent 

consulting on matters such as patent applications. 

Thanks to this support, the company has been able to overcome numerous challenges. Most of all, with 

Born2Global’s patent consulting services and support, Ovitz was able to gain a competitive edge early on. 

Kim said, “Patents are crucial to technology-based companies. Over the past two years, we have filed 

numerous patent applications, resulting in one registered patent so far.” He also emphasized, “Supportedby 

the expertise of Born2Global’s lawyers and patent attorneys, we wereable to concentrate on the essentials 

of our business.”

 

Ovitz to Expand into Vietnam and Cambodia

 

Ovitz also offers assistance for people with poor eyesight in developing countries, providing them access 

to eye tests and connecting them to the eye care service sand treatments they need. This year, it will launch 

a tele medicine program with NGOs in Phnom Penh and SiemReap, in Cambodia, as well as in Vietnam. 

Through these programs, Ovitz will sell its devices to its partner NGOs, check the vision and eye health of 

underprivileged people remotely, and send the information collected to hospitals so that the people may 

receive proper treatment.

 

In January last year, Ovitz, with the support of KOICA, provided telemedicine services in Bangladesh using 

its eye diagnostic device. Locals used the device to test the vision of underprivileged people and sent the 

information to hospitals for use in providing treatment. 

Kim said,“Since under privileged people with poor access to eye care often do not know whether they need 

glasses or have eye problems, we need to first educate them and then instruct them on howto access eye 

care services and treatment.” He added,“Our goal is to go beyond simply providing aid and develop this 

into a sustain able business.”

 

Large proportions of the populations of Vietnam and Cambodia have visual impairments, but many of them 

do not wear glasses. Ovitz will work with several NGOs to study the social and economic impacts of blindness 

and visual impairments in such countries. “Degradation of vision has a major negative impact on quality of life; 

yet people tend to be unaware of its importance and impact,” said Kim. 

“I think a lot of research needs to be done on, for example, how much learning efficiency would increase if 

schoolchildren with poor eyesight indeveloping countries were given eyeglasses, how much productivity would 

increase if glasses were given to workers with poor eyesight, and how much the traffic accident rate would decrease 

if glasses were given to drivers with poor eyesight.”

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Our member in this article

 

Description

Embodying an Advanced Application of Wavefront Sensor 

in a Portable Autorefractor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Vision loss is irreversible, like spilled water. However, it is preventable.”

 

Ovitz into Market for Portable, Low-Cost Eye Diagnostic Devices Rather 

than Focusing on Expensive Equipment

 

Ovitz has developed a compact, portable eye diagnostic device for people who are unable to have 

their eyes examined on a regular basis.

CEO Felix Kim studied at the a Flaum Eye Institute at the University of Rochester, in the United States. 

At first, he was interested in the development of premium eye diagnostic equipment, but changed 

his mind after participating in a public eye care program for vulnerable groups. 

In countries with low population densities, such as the United States, and developing countries that 

lack hospitals, many people have insufficient access to optometrists and ophthalmologists. 

 

 

Kim said, “When I went to urban outskirts areas to participate in the public eye care program, 

I found that most of the residents there are black or elderly people. I felt sorry for them, because 

even though they didn’t need tests or diagnoses requiring high-end equipment, they had too few 

opportunities to have their vision tested and eyes checked.” He added, “It was difficult to test the 

vision and eye health of these people using the existing eye diagnostic device, so I started developing 

a more portable and convenient device.”

 

Kim entered the portable eye diagnostic device business after winning a prize for a project that he 

had started as a part of his job and later succeeded in attracting investment to develop his idea. 

Ovitz was incorporated in the United States in November 2013 and established a Korean subsidiary 

in 2015. Kim began building his business by recruiting scientists, optical engineers, and business 

people with expertise in medical devices and experience in pharmaceutical companies. 

He said, “I did research at an optical research institute, but I found it quite difficult for a college 

student like myself to work alone and make progress in the highly specialized fields of hardware, 

high-precision optics, and medical devices.” He went onto add, “Rather than trying to acquire the 

necessary knowledge in such fields myself, I set out to find and recruit top experts in these fields to 

join my team.”

 

Compact, Fast, Portable Eye Diagnostic Device

 

 

Ovitz’s eye diagnostic device is capable of testing and diagnosing large numbers of people more 

quickly and cheaply than other much more expensive devices. Much smaller than the eye diagnostic 

instruments used in typical ophthalmology clinics and optical shops, the company’s device is about 

one-tenth the size of an adult’s fist, and it can measure the various high-order aberration information 

required for LASIK and LASEK surgery and detect vision problems, including myopia and astigmatism. 

The device is simple and easy to use for the elderly, handicapped, and children. “A member of our team 

who has a daughter with autism suddenly had the idea to test his daughter’s vision using our device.

He discovered that her eyesight was bad, so much so that she actually needed glasses,” Kim said. 

“This shows just how beneficial our eye diagnostic device can be for people with disabilities or low 

accessibility to eye care services.”

 

 

 

 

Having already completed four clinical trials, Ovitz’s portable eye diagnostic device is due to enter 

production soon, with the company planning to start selling the product in the first quarter of this year. 

Once its cloud service platform and mobile applications are complete, the company will begin focusing 

on expanding its sales volume. 

Kim said,“This year, we will work hard to make progress and increase sales while engaging in activities 

with NGOs.” He went onto explain,“By accumulating a large volume of data on eye function and health 

in the longterm, we will be able to offer blindness prevention solutions, which we will develop in cooperation 

with NGOs.”

 

Substantial Legal and Patent Support from Born2Global

 

Since its inception, even prior to the establishment of its Korean subsidiary, Ovitz has received support 

from the Born2Global Centre, especially legal consulting on how to attract greater investment and patent 

consulting on matters such as patent applications. 

Thanks to this support, the company has been able to overcome numerous challenges. Most of all, with 

Born2Global’s patent consulting services and support, Ovitz was able to gain a competitive edge early on. 

Kim said, “Patents are crucial to technology-based companies. Over the past two years, we have filed 

numerous patent applications, resulting in one registered patent so far.” He also emphasized, “Supportedby 

the expertise of Born2Global’s lawyers and patent attorneys, we wereable to concentrate on the essentials 

of our business.”

 

Ovitz to Expand into Vietnam and Cambodia

 

Ovitz also offers assistance for people with poor eyesight in developing countries, providing them access 

to eye tests and connecting them to the eye care service sand treatments they need. This year, it will launch 

a tele medicine program with NGOs in Phnom Penh and SiemReap, in Cambodia, as well as in Vietnam. 

Through these programs, Ovitz will sell its devices to its partner NGOs, check the vision and eye health of 

underprivileged people remotely, and send the information collected to hospitals so that the people may 

receive proper treatment.

 

In January last year, Ovitz, with the support of KOICA, provided telemedicine services in Bangladesh using 

its eye diagnostic device. Locals used the device to test the vision of underprivileged people and sent the 

information to hospitals for use in providing treatment. 

Kim said,“Since under privileged people with poor access to eye care often do not know whether they need 

glasses or have eye problems, we need to first educate them and then instruct them on howto access eye 

care services and treatment.” He added,“Our goal is to go beyond simply providing aid and develop this 

into a sustain able business.”

 

Large proportions of the populations of Vietnam and Cambodia have visual impairments, but many of them 

do not wear glasses. Ovitz will work with several NGOs to study the social and economic impacts of blindness 

and visual impairments in such countries. “Degradation of vision has a major negative impact on quality of life; 

yet people tend to be unaware of its importance and impact,” said Kim. 

“I think a lot of research needs to be done on, for example, how much learning efficiency would increase if 

schoolchildren with poor eyesight indeveloping countries were given eyeglasses, how much productivity would 

increase if glasses were given to workers with poor eyesight, and how much the traffic accident rate would decrease 

if glasses were given to drivers with poor eyesight.”

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Our member in this article

 

Description

Embodying an Advanced Application of Wavefront Sensor 

in a Portable Autorefractor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Newsletter Sign Up

By clicking "submit," you agree to receive emails from Bron2Global and accept our web terms of use and privacy and cookie policy*Terms apply.

Apply now for 2022 Boot-X Batch 2 program! (7/8 ~ 8/15 Mon 24:00 KST)

X